Archive for the ‘Contributions to the World’ Category

Deep Sea Diving Hugs – Roberto Galeazzi’s Contribution To The World

Thursday, 23 July 2015

Deep Sea Hugs 1935

Deep Sea Hugs 2 1935

[Found here.]

Pat Reidy’s Contribution to the World: Coca-Cola Museum, Xalapa, Mexico

Sunday, 19 July 2015

Coke 3

Coke 2

Coke 5

Coke 6

Coke 1

Hi, Pat. I see that your love for Coca-Cola is still alive and well. Why do you love it so much?

Pat Reidy: Well, firstly, I really like the flavor, but I also think that it represents one of the best publicity campaigns that there’s ever been in the world. It’s international, it’s intelligent, and uses everything to promote its brand. People see a T-shirt, a toy, a poster or whatever, and want to drink a Coke. Coca-Cola invented Santa Claus, and that says everything.

[…]

Yes, please. Tell me about the steps I need to follow in order to be a professional Coca-Cola drinker.
You should always drink it really cold; always from a glass bottle, or maybe from a can, but never, ever from a plastic bottle. The best Coke is the one that comes from the tiny glass bottle. I always buy the 355-milliliter glass bottle, though.

How many Cokes do you drink a day?
I don’t drink it much nowadays. I drink one 355-milliliter bottle a day and I really enjoy it—you have no idea. Unless there’s a party or a special occasion; then I drink more. But that’s what I do now, because for years, when I had to teach 12 hours a day, drinking Coke was my salvation. I used to drink 15 355-milliliter bottles a day.

Was it ever bad for your health?
Never. Back then there was no water. There was no purified water and they didn’t sell water gallons to keep at home. So between drinking boiled water or Coke, well, there is no contest, really. I also cook with Coca-Cola.

What do you cook with Coke?
You can cook many things with Coca-Cola. I even have recipe books. My specialty is a hamburger that I make with my secret recipe. I fry it on my grandmother’s pan—which is huge—with Coca-Cola instead of oil, a bit of English sauce, pepper, garlic salt, and onions. It’s wonderful. I call it Pat’s hamburger. I also use it in soups. I love it.

[Images and commetary found here, via here.]

Independence Day 2015

Saturday, 4 July 2015

Editing The Declaration of Independence1776

Today is the Commemoration of the Birth of a New Nation, conceived in Liberty, on the self-evident proposition that All Men are created equal. No other nation in history accomplished what these 13 Colonies did, and no other nation in history achieved what the United States of America accomplished in such a relatively short time span. God Bless America.

When in the Course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature’s God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation.

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.

READ IT.

Better yet, read it while listening to this:

Stars and Stripes Forever

Note that the link to the recording dated August 1903 contains a politically correct disclaimer:

WARNING: These historical recordings may contain offensive or inappropriate language.

That warning, attached to a recording of a classic John Philip Sousa composition from the early 1900s, was intended as a caution to those who might be offended by the *ahem* lyrics. Pure idiocy.

Have a great Independence Day, and Remember Always.

 

Saturday Matinee – R.I.P. B.B. King (1925-2015)

Saturday, 16 May 2015

BB King

The Blues had fallen out of favor in the U.S. recording market in the 1960s, as it was considered retro and passé. Many talented blues musicians from the ’40s and ’50s were left with few options until British rock bands took notice and revived the genre by covering various classic American blues songs, often without credit, which fomented a resurgence of interest in the original recordings. The British were largely responsible for restarting the careers of such notables as Muddy Waters and Howlin’ Wolf. Even early blues-based rock and rollers Chuck Berry, Little Richard and Bo Diddley got career boosts, and all were more popular in England than they were in the United States at that time.

Riley B. “Blues Boy” King was one of the greatest bluesmen of all time, known for his roaring vocals and understated guitar solos. He paid the cost to be the boss, and this BBC documentary from 1972 is amazing. There’s no posing, no strutting or preening, just straight talk about influences and style in a refreshingly honest manner. There’s no point in posting other B.B. King videos here because this one covers it all.

R.I.P. Mr. King. That’s one hell of a legacy you left us.

M. Gaudron’s Contribution to The World: The 1910 Aerial Torpedo Boat

Monday, 6 April 2015

1901 Latest Flying Machine

“This machine is the invention of M. Gaudron, a Frenchman, who claims that in this perfected ‘aerial torpedo boat’ 100 feet long five passengers can be carried at a speed of 30 miles an hour.”

The article doesn’t mention where the passengers might be carried to at 30 mph, but after 114 years, who cares. [Found here.]

Aztec Death Whistle

Sunday, 8 February 2015
Replica Aztec Death Whistle (with typical cross section).

Replica Aztec Death Whistle (with typical cross section).

It sounds exactly what my daughter’s boyfriend listens to. At first I thought it was a hoax, but apparently it’s not.

[Found here, via here.]

Screen Caps – How To Make

Tuesday, 27 January 2015

Retro Screen Cap

That’s a CRT Trace Camera for HP 54600 series digitizing oscilloscopes, but you already knew that. Circa 1991, that state of the art high-tech appurtenance would cost over $1k in 2015 dollars.

[Found here.]

The Entire Bible In 30 Minutes Or Less.

Sunday, 28 December 2014

Bible

I’ve never read much of The Bible (with the exception of Genesis and The Book of Revelations when I was a teenager – I liked the Sci-Fi aspects). I’m not a particularly religious person, certainly not devout; I consider myself a non-practicing Presbyterian heathen.

A website found me on Christmas Day, and I found this post interesting:

The entire Bible in 30 minutes or less.

Here’s the gist of it:

God creates man.
Man rebels.
God initiates redemption.
God accomplishes redemption.
God gives birth to the church.
God completes redemption.

The following is reposted by permission of the author. It’s not a parody or satire, and it’s worth sharing. (more…)

Simon Beck’s Contribution To The World

Sunday, 14 December 2014

Simon Beck Drafting 1

Simon Beck Drafting 2

No, those aren’t amateur drafting exercises on aged parchment. Take your best guess before you click below. (Hint: I adjusted the perspective, enhanced the contrast and manipulated the colors a bit. That gray triangle was unavoidable.)

(more…)

Saturday Matinee – Lee Morse; Doc Watson, David Grisman & Jack Lawrence, & Jimmie Rogers

Saturday, 6 December 2014

Here’s a description of Lee Morse [via]:

“She was 5 feet tall. She was less than 100 lbs “soaking wet”. She spent her childhood in Oregon and Idaho yet was proud of her family’s Southern roots. She could hunt and fish and, if you deserved it, she could punch your lights out! She was Lee Morse, one of the most popular female recording artists during the Jazz Age 20’s and 30’s. And, she is worth remembering.” ~Ian House

Doc Watson, David “Dawg” Grisman and Jack Lawrence live in 1995. Lawrence was the late Watson’s accompianist for many years.

“My Blue Eyed Jane” was written by Lulu Belle White and Jimmie Rogers, first recorded by Jimmy Rogers with Bob Sawyer’s Jazz Band in 1930.

Jimmie Rogers (1897-1933) is considered the Father of Country Music for his long-lasting music influences, worked the railroad until he contracted tuberculosis in 1925. While fighting off the disease and unable to perform physical labor, he returned to his original love, writing and performing, until he succumbed at the age of 35.

Sadly, there was a vaccine to combat TB as early as 1921, but according to Wiki it wasn’t widely available in the U.S. or Europe until after WWII. Rogers also sang about his affliction in “TB Blues.”

Here’s Jimmie Rogers in the Columbia Pictures short “The Singing Brakeman” from 1930.

That’s it for this edition of The Saturday Matinee. Have a great weekend, folks.

 

 


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