Archive for the ‘Contributions to the World’ Category

Margo Lillie’s Contribution To The World: The Physics of Cow Tipping

Sunday, 29 November 2015

“Every cow who gives good service deserves a tip.”

– Bunk Strutts 2015

Physics of Cow Tipping 1

A 2005 study led by Margo Lillie, a zoologist at the University of British Columbia, concluded that tipping a cow would require an exertion of 2,910 newtons (654.2 lbf) of force, and is therefore impossible to accomplish by a single person. Her calculations found that it would take at least two people to apply enough force to push over a cow if the cow did not react and reorient its footing. If the cow did react, it would take at least four people to push it over. Lillie noted that cattle are well aware of their surroundings and are very difficult to surprise, due to excellent senses of both smell and hearing, but that according to laws of static physics, “two people might be able to tip a cow” if the cow were “tipped quickly—the cow’s centre of mass would have to be pushed over its hoof before the cow could react”. The Lillie Study has been replicated by other researchers, who confirmed that at least two to four people can, in fact, push over a cow.

Money quote: The Lillie Study has been replicated by other researchers, who confirmed that at least two to four people can, in fact, push over a cow.

I’m no rocket surgeon, but adolescence and alcohol are usually associated with stories of cow-tipping, and I imagine that Ms. Lillie and the other researchers who replicated the study had a blast that night.

[Explanatory graphic found here, study description from here, and trippytippy cows are here.]

Dr. Julius Vogel’s Contribution To The World: PeePee Color Analysis

Sunday, 15 November 2015

Pee Pee Colors

I’d be very worried if I whizzed anything past No. 4.

From what I can tell, Dr. Julius Vogel of Germany (not to be confused with Sir Julius Vogel of New Zealand) was instrumental in detecting disease and other maladies by analyzing urine samples in the mid to late 1800s and writing treatises about it and other studies involving the endocrine system. And yes, he wrote about “asparagus pee.” It’s because of Dr. Vogel that your doctor asks you to piss in a cup.

You can read an entire 1876 Treatise by Dr. William Roberts M.D. on urine color diagnoses that features the work of Dr. Vogel here.

[Image with link found here.]

Do Women & Children Keep Borrowing Your Pen Knife? Here’s A Solution.

Monday, 5 October 2015

Planetary Pencil Pointer 1

Planetary Pencil Pointer 2

With a cast iron frame designed to be screwed down to the desktop, this machine eliminated the need for whittling and sanding pencils, and saved businesses countless hours in lost productivity.

It’s called a “Planetary Pencil Sharpener” because it relies on planetary gears revolving around a sun gear, and all are held in place with a ring gear.

Spirograph worked on the same basic principal, but it sure as hell couldn’t sharpen a pencil.

[Top image found here, via here. Bottom image from here.]

Hot Links To Chu

Sunday, 13 September 2015

Chu Berry Album Cover CHU

The Argument Of The Beard goes like this:

“…For if once a man indulges himself in murder, very soon he comes to think little of robbing; and from robbing he comes next to drinking and Sabbath-breaking, and from that to incivility and procrastination. Once [one] begin[s] upon this downward path, you never know where you are to stop. Many a man has dated his ruin from some murder or other that perhaps he thought little of at the time.”
–Thomas DeQuincey

Yet another way to win at Rock Paper Scissors.

It’s 11:22 according to the ferrofluid clock.

Mare brings horseyhubby a sammich [via].

Haka for Mr. Dawson Tamatea’s funeral.

Ever wondered what people do with clam saliva? Here you go.

BREAKING NEWS: The Antarctic ice cap is reportedly melting due to Anthropogenic Global Climate Change™. That means the temperature at the South Pole has risen at least 120 degrees Fahrenheit, and it’s all your fault. [More here]

Chu Berry & His Stompy Stevedores with “ChuBerry Jam” from 1937 [via].

Deep Sea Diving Hugs – Roberto Galeazzi’s Contribution To The World

Thursday, 23 July 2015

Deep Sea Hugs 1935

Deep Sea Hugs 2 1935

[Found here.]

Pat Reidy’s Contribution to the World: Coca-Cola Museum, Xalapa, Mexico

Sunday, 19 July 2015

Coke 3

Coke 2

Coke 5

Coke 6

Coke 1

Hi, Pat. I see that your love for Coca-Cola is still alive and well. Why do you love it so much?

Pat Reidy: Well, firstly, I really like the flavor, but I also think that it represents one of the best publicity campaigns that there’s ever been in the world. It’s international, it’s intelligent, and uses everything to promote its brand. People see a T-shirt, a toy, a poster or whatever, and want to drink a Coke. Coca-Cola invented Santa Claus, and that says everything.


Yes, please. Tell me about the steps I need to follow in order to be a professional Coca-Cola drinker.
You should always drink it really cold; always from a glass bottle, or maybe from a can, but never, ever from a plastic bottle. The best Coke is the one that comes from the tiny glass bottle. I always buy the 355-milliliter glass bottle, though.

How many Cokes do you drink a day?
I don’t drink it much nowadays. I drink one 355-milliliter bottle a day and I really enjoy it—you have no idea. Unless there’s a party or a special occasion; then I drink more. But that’s what I do now, because for years, when I had to teach 12 hours a day, drinking Coke was my salvation. I used to drink 15 355-milliliter bottles a day.

Was it ever bad for your health?
Never. Back then there was no water. There was no purified water and they didn’t sell water gallons to keep at home. So between drinking boiled water or Coke, well, there is no contest, really. I also cook with Coca-Cola.

What do you cook with Coke?
You can cook many things with Coca-Cola. I even have recipe books. My specialty is a hamburger that I make with my secret recipe. I fry it on my grandmother’s pan—which is huge—with Coca-Cola instead of oil, a bit of English sauce, pepper, garlic salt, and onions. It’s wonderful. I call it Pat’s hamburger. I also use it in soups. I love it.

[Images and commetary found here, via here.]

Independence Day 2015

Saturday, 4 July 2015

Editing The Declaration of Independence1776

Today is the Commemoration of the Birth of a New Nation, conceived in Liberty, on the self-evident proposition that All Men are created equal. No other nation in history accomplished what these 13 Colonies did, and no other nation in history achieved what the United States of America accomplished in such a relatively short time span. God Bless America.

When in the Course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another, and to assume among the powers of the earth, the separate and equal station to which the Laws of Nature and of Nature’s God entitle them, a decent respect to the opinions of mankind requires that they should declare the causes which impel them to the separation.

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.


Better yet, read it while listening to this:

Stars and Stripes Forever

Note that the link to the recording dated August 1903 contains a politically correct disclaimer:

WARNING: These historical recordings may contain offensive or inappropriate language.

That warning, attached to a recording of a classic John Philip Sousa composition from the early 1900s, was intended as a caution to those who might be offended by the *ahem* lyrics. Pure idiocy.

Have a great Independence Day, and Remember Always.


Saturday Matinee – R.I.P. B.B. King (1925-2015)

Saturday, 16 May 2015

BB King

The Blues had fallen out of favor in the U.S. recording market in the 1960s, as it was considered retro and passé. Many talented blues musicians from the ’40s and ’50s were left with few options until British rock bands took notice and revived the genre by covering various classic American blues songs, often without credit, which fomented a resurgence of interest in the original recordings. The British were largely responsible for restarting the careers of such notables as Muddy Waters and Howlin’ Wolf. Even early blues-based rock and rollers Chuck Berry, Little Richard and Bo Diddley got career boosts, and all were more popular in England than they were in the United States at that time.

Riley B. “Blues Boy” King was one of the greatest bluesmen of all time, known for his roaring vocals and understated guitar solos. He paid the cost to be the boss, and this BBC documentary from 1972 is amazing. There’s no posing, no strutting or preening, just straight talk about influences and style in a refreshingly honest manner. There’s no point in posting other B.B. King videos here because this one covers it all.

R.I.P. Mr. King. That’s one hell of a legacy you left us.

M. Gaudron’s Contribution to The World: The 1910 Aerial Torpedo Boat

Monday, 6 April 2015

1901 Latest Flying Machine

“This machine is the invention of M. Gaudron, a Frenchman, who claims that in this perfected ‘aerial torpedo boat’ 100 feet long five passengers can be carried at a speed of 30 miles an hour.”

The article doesn’t mention where the passengers might be carried to at 30 mph, but after 114 years, who cares. [Found here.]

Aztec Death Whistle

Sunday, 8 February 2015
Replica Aztec Death Whistle (with typical cross section).

Replica Aztec Death Whistle (with typical cross section).

It sounds exactly what my daughter’s boyfriend listens to. At first I thought it was a hoax, but apparently it’s not.

[Found here, via here.]


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