Archive for the ‘Contributions to the World’ Category

To All Veterans Who Start Out Like This To Protect That.

Tuesday, 11 November 2014

Veterans Day

Always Remember The Armistice

The 11th Hour of the 11th Day of the 11th Month of 1918.
And remember that the Treaty of Versailles was merely Détente.
GOD BLESS ALL VETERANS

Respect

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Tension and Compression

Wednesday, 1 October 2014

Tension & Compression

A demonstration of the mathematical principles of the original Forth Bridge in Scotland performed at Imperial College in 1887. The central ‘weight’ is Kaichi Watanabe, one of the first Japanese engineers to study in the UK, while Sir John Fowler and Benjamin Baker provide the supports.

Long-span structural engineering illustrated. Note that weight is not the problem with this truss, but uplift is, hence the weights at the extreme ends of the truss. Tension is transferred from the exterior weights through the arms of the two men near the ends of the span, while compression struts keep this structure from collapsing under the dead weight of Mr. Watanabe.  Note also that without the weight provided by Mr. Watanabe, this structure collapses (unless Messrs. Fowler and Baker scooch over and hold hands).

[Found here.]

Heinrich Hoffman’s Contribution To The World

Sunday, 14 September 2014

Harriet & The Matches

 “The Dreadful Story about Harriet and the Matches”
from Der Struwwelpeter (1845) a popular German children’s book by Heinrich Hoffmann.

Hoffmann was the German precursor to Charles Addams, writing and illustrating short stories/poems for children that can only be described as violent and bizarre. Judging by his popularity, both children and adults loved them (and still do) and he was translated into many languages. Mark Twain’s English translation was published posthumously, and he took some liberties to make the stories rhyme.

Check out Hoffman’s “Die Geschichte vom Daumenlutscher” or “The Story of Little Suck-a-Thumb.”

Hoffman, besides being a writer of satire for both children and adults, despised authoritarianism (he even did a lampoon of Adolf Hitler), worked as a psychiatrist in an insane asylum treating paupers. His Wiki bio is interesting.

[Image and caption found here; Our non-comprehensive Archive of “Contributions To The World” here.]

Giuseppe Arcimboldo’s Contribution To The World: A Painting Of A Deformed Goat Hoof

Thursday, 4 September 2014

Arcimboldo's Goat Hoof 1563

Giuseppe Arcimboldo, Study of a goat’s deformed hoof, 1563

The artist who painted a deformed goat’s hoof was the same guy who painted all those famous portraits consisting of fruits and vegetables. True.

[Found here.]

Stephen Gray’s Contribution To The World

Thursday, 14 August 2014

Magnetic Boy

Stephen Gray was pursuing a long series of experiments with electricity. In producing charge on a long glass tube, he discovered in 1729 that he could communicate the electrical effect to other objects by direct connection. Using string, he could charge an object over 50 feet from the rubbed tube, but oddly enough some other substances, such as silk thread, would not carry charge. Brass wire would transmit charge even better. These experiments with charged strings and glass tubes revealed the properties of conduction, insulation, and transmission.

The depiction above shows one of Gray’s most famous experiments, in which he showed that a boy suspended by (insulating) silk cords could be charged (with the glass tube) and then as a (conducting) body could (electrostatically) attract small objects. Dramatic experiments such as these became quite well-known. Finally, after Newton’s death in 1732, Gray was admitted as a member of the Royal Society in recognition of his efforts, but he died destitute a few years later in 1736. [via]

[Image found here.]

RIP Robin Williams (1951-2014)

Tuesday, 12 August 2014

Robin Williams RIP

Here’s a classic Williams routine: “How The Scotts Invented Golf.” [Language warning - NSFK].

Heaven’s now got Robin Williams, Jonathan Winters, Sid Caesar and others, and you can bet that God is laughing his ass off right now… about golf.

Nanu Nanu, Mork.

Full Moon Heros

Sunday, 10 August 2014

APOLLO Astronauts Collins Lovell & Aldrin

Mike Collins, Jim Lovell & I [Buzz Aldrin] got a behind the scenes look at the Orion capsule being built at Kennedy Space Center. Like our bunny suits?

I shouldn’t have to tell you who these guys are or what they did, but all three have titanium cojones.

Lovell’s book “Lost Moon” is a can’t-put-down white-knuckle read, and was the basis for the excellent movie “Apollo 13.”

[Image and Aldrin’s caption found here.]

P.S. Tonight’s full moon is a “supermoon.”

Saturday Matinee – Johnny Winter (1944–2014)

Saturday, 19 July 2014

Johnny Winter 1944-2014

Johnny Winter, legendary guitarist and one of the most recognizable icons of Texas blues and rock passed away at the age of 70 earlier this week after a long career.

In a documentary released this year entitled “Johnny Winter Down and Dirty,” he laughed, “Made my first record when I was 15, started playing clubs when I was 15. Started drinking and smoking when I was 15. Sex when I was 15. Fifteen was a big year for me.”

According to Wiki, at age 10 he and his 8 year old brother Edgar played on local TV in his hometown of Beaumont Texas.  Johnny Winter performed for an astounding 60 years, and he died while on still on tour.



RIP, Johnny. You made our roadtrips a hellalotta fun.

R.I.P. Erdélyi Tamás, aka Tommy Ramone

Sunday, 13 July 2014

Tommy Ramone RIP 2014

Another punk bit the big one.

Erdélyi Tamás, aka Tom Erdelyi, aka Tommy Ramone, assembled and helped create one of the most influential bands ever. The Ramones never had a hit single, despite hiring the legendary (and mentally disturbed) Phil Spector.

Tommy Ramone was not new to the recording industry when he and other Brooklyn friends decided to form a band to provide an alternative to the pre-packaged marketing-department formulaic garbage that infested the airwaves in the mid to late 1970s. The Ramones went back to rock and roll garage-band basics, with a twist – they played louder and faster.

That The Ramones rose to popularity by playing 3-chord rock in an obscure venue in the New York City Bowery district says a lot. Punk was born at CBGB’s, and although The Ramones’ garage-band style never garnered them a hit, their influence was huge.

Their message was, “Screw Emerson Lake and Palmer, Yes, Kansas, Foreigner and ELO! Screw CSN&Y and Boston! Listen to C, F & G!”

And The Ramones were spot on. R.I.P. Erdélyi Tamás, and thanks.

[Crossposted from here.]

Rail Roadtrip = Pure Awesome.

Sunday, 13 July 2014

RRoadtrip SEFT-1

Artists Ivan Puig and Andrés Padilla Domene (Los Ferronautas) built their striking silver road-rail SEFT-1 vehicle to explore the abandoned passenger railways of Mexico and Ecuador, capturing their journeys in videos, photographs and collected objects.

Between 2006 and 2011, the artists traveled across Mexico and Ecuador in the SEFT-1 (Sonda de Exploración Ferroviaria Tripulada or Manned Railway Exploration Probe). In a transdisciplinary art project, they set out to explore disused railways as a starting point for reflection and research, recording the landscapes and infrastructure around and between cities. Interviewing people they met, often from communities isolated by Mexico’s passenger railway closures, they shared their findings online, seft1.com, where audiences could track the probe’s trajectory, view maps and images and listen to interviews.

RRoadtrip 1
RRoadtrip 2

RRoadtrip

[Found here. Related posts here and here.]


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