Archive for the ‘History’ Category

Heinrich Hoffman’s Contribution To The World

Sunday, 14 September 2014

Harriet & The Matches

 “The Dreadful Story about Harriet and the Matches”
from Der Struwwelpeter (1845) a popular German children’s book by Heinrich Hoffmann.

Hoffmann was the German precursor to Charles Addams, writing and illustrating short stories/poems for children that can only be described as violent and bizarre. Judging by his popularity, both children and adults loved them (and still do) and he was translated into many languages. Mark Twain’s English translation was published posthumously, and he took some liberties to make the stories rhyme.

Check out Hoffman’s “Die Geschichte vom Daumenlutscher” or “The Story of Little Suck-a-Thumb.”

Hoffman, besides being a writer of satire for both children and adults, despised authoritarianism (he even did a lampoon of Adolf Hitler), worked as a psychiatrist in an insane asylum treating paupers. His Wiki bio is interesting.

[Image and caption found here; Our non-comprehensive Archive of "Contributions To The World" here.]

About these ads

11 September 2001 – NEVER FORGET.

Thursday, 11 September 2014

911

Happy Labor Day

Monday, 1 September 2014

Detroit Machine Shop 1903

November 1903. “Assembling room, Leland & Faulconer Manufacturing Co., Detroit. Men working in foundry and machine shop that produced automobile engines and merged with Cadillac Motor Co. in 1905.”

[Image and caption found here. Brief history of the origins of Labor Day here.]

Home Wrecker (Not Napa California)

Wednesday, 27 August 2014

Home Wrecker

That’s an AP photo of destruction caused by the 23 February 2011 earthquake, Christchurch New Zealand.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/australiaandthepacific/newzealand/8340925/Christchurch-earthquake-as-it-happened-Feb-23.html

[Found in here.]

[Update: Corrected date of Christchurch earthquake.]

RAF Supermarine Spitfire

Monday, 18 August 2014

RAF Supermarine Spitfire WWII

[Image found here, history of the Spitfire here, and wiki here.]

Stephen Gray’s Contribution To The World

Thursday, 14 August 2014

Magnetic Boy

Stephen Gray was pursuing a long series of experiments with electricity. In producing charge on a long glass tube, he discovered in 1729 that he could communicate the electrical effect to other objects by direct connection. Using string, he could charge an object over 50 feet from the rubbed tube, but oddly enough some other substances, such as silk thread, would not carry charge. Brass wire would transmit charge even better. These experiments with charged strings and glass tubes revealed the properties of conduction, insulation, and transmission.

The depiction above shows one of Gray’s most famous experiments, in which he showed that a boy suspended by (insulating) silk cords could be charged (with the glass tube) and then as a (conducting) body could (electrostatically) attract small objects. Dramatic experiments such as these became quite well-known. Finally, after Newton’s death in 1732, Gray was admitted as a member of the Royal Society in recognition of his efforts, but he died destitute a few years later in 1736. [via]

[Image found here.]

Some Toe Tapping Music

Wednesday, 13 August 2014

USSR Xray Vinyl

“Before the availability of the tape recorder and during the 1950s, when vinyl was scarce, people in the Soviet Union began making records of banned Western music on discarded x-rays.”

[Image and caption found here.]

Full Moon Heros

Sunday, 10 August 2014

APOLLO Astronauts Collins Lovell & Aldrin

Mike Collins, Jim Lovell & I [Buzz Aldrin] got a behind the scenes look at the Orion capsule being built at Kennedy Space Center. Like our bunny suits?

I shouldn’t have to tell you who these guys are or what they did, but all three have titanium cojones.

Lovell’s book “Lost Moon” is a can’t-put-down white-knuckle read, and was the basis for the excellent movie “Apollo 13.”

[Image and Aldrin's caption found here.]

P.S. Tonight’s full moon is a “supermoon.”

One Ringy Dingy

Wednesday, 16 July 2014

1910 Toy Telephone

“This full-size handmade toy has a bell mechanism (a cowbell inside which rings when the crank is wound) a hook, a receiver and traces of paint. Made from scrap wood for a child when toys were made at home. Circa 1910.”

[Found here.]

British WWI Body Armor

Monday, 7 July 2014

WWI Body Armor

[Found here.]


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 546 other followers

%d bloggers like this: