Archive for the ‘Saturday Matinee’ Category

Saturday Matinee – All Your Bass Are Belong To Us

Saturday, 25 July 2015

Postmodern Jukebox‘s “All About That Bass” has just the right amount of slink with a cool bass stunt.

There’s some serious funkslappin going on in Marcus Miller‘s 2008 jam version of Tower of Power‘s 1973 hit “What Is Hip.”

This 6-string bass street jammer’s pretty good, too.

We’ve posted Willie Dixon‘s classic “Bassology” before, and it’s a good wrap up for this edition of The Saturday Matinee. Have a great weekend, folks.

Saturday Matinee – RT & The 44’s, Speedbuggy USA, Dave & Phil Alvin

Saturday, 18 July 2015

RT N’ THE 44s is Swimmy Webb, Brendan Willard, Leif Bunting, Johnny Sneed, and RT Valine. Featuring Timbo of Speedbuggy on slide can [via]. Awesome roots rock.

Speedbuggy USA cranks it. How about some more retro?

The Blasters were awesome and put on a great show when I saw them at the Whiskey in 1981 or so. (They were the warmup band for The Fabulous Thunderbirds.) Here are brothers Phil and Dave Alvin pickin’ and flickin’ in 2014.

Have a great weekend, folks.
Be back here tomorrow for more stuff.

Saturday Matinee – Bonus

Saturday, 11 July 2015

To lighten it up a tad from the previous rant, this is clever.

[via]

 

The Saturday Matinee Dixie Edition – Duane Eddy, Little Feat & The Band

Saturday, 11 July 2015

confederate-flag-military-0

If this flag represents slavery, racism and oppression, then every flag of every nation in existence in 1776 did so as well. So what. This country abolished slavery over a hundred years ago, yet slavery still thrives in many parts of the world, most notably Africa and the middle east. Where’s the outrage over that?

There is none because the attack on the Confederate Flag has nothing to do with slavery or racism, and everything to do with attacking fiscally conservative southern politicians.

Let’s rock.

The late racist Dick Clark brings racist Duane Eddy onto American Bandstand to perform “Rebel Rouser” wearing Confederate garb.

The racist band Little Feat performs “Dixie Chicken” featuring racist vocalists Bonnie Raitt and Emmylou Harris.

The Band‘s classic racist song is a good wrap up for this racist edition of The Saturday Matinee. Have a great weekend, folks, and let’s STOP THE IDIOCY

 

Saturday Matinee 1977 – The Tubes, The Sanford-Townsend Band & Manfred Mann’s Earth Band

Saturday, 20 June 2015

The Tubes “WPOD” featuring Fee Waybill as Quay Lewd in 1977. I missed out on seeing them live, but I have a couple of their early albums. “Don’t Touch Me There” was one of my favorites; lotta talent in that band.

I remember that year (and the Winter of 77-78) and it was about that time I realized that I hated a lot of the garbage the rock stations were pumping (czech out the 1977 Top 100 Billboard List. Leo Sayer? Really?) My music preferences went rogue.

However, there are a couple of songs on that list that I secretly liked, like this one:

The Sanford-Townsend Band‘s “Smoke From A Distant Fire” was such an up-beat song, and it got the girls dancing. (Heh – the band was introduced by Helen Reddy.)

Two years later, Rickie Lee Jones recorded an almost identical song chord-wise, “Chuck E.’s In Love,” and I loved that one, too.

In 1975 Aerosmith came out with their classic “Walk This Way” and it climbed all the way up to No. 90 in 1977. Go figger. The only other song on that Billboard List that I remember liking much was this one:

Manfred Mann’s Earth Band‘s version of Bruce Springsteen‘s “Blinded By The Light” was more popular than the original and made it to No. 36 on the Billboard Top 100 for 1977. (BTW, Mann was never the lead  singer. He was the keyboardist.)

Have a great Fathers’ Day Weekend folks, appreciate all that your dad does (or did) for you, and we’ll see you back here tomorrow.

Saturday Matinee – Animals & Mirrors, The Doghouse, The Greg Johnson Set & The Fabulous Thunderbirds

Saturday, 6 June 2015

Animals and mirrors [via].

Beware of The Doghouse. Been there. I overlooked the first Valentine’s Day post-marriage as I considered it to be a dating holiday. I ate damp corrugated cardboard for months [via].

The Greg Johnson Set is a band from New Zealand, sounds like a traditional Irish band, performs “People Can’t Talk In This Town” from 1992. Somehow the concept of Freedom of Speech is being quietly vanquished [via].

Lets lighten it up a tad. How ’bout some great rippin’ by Jimmie Vaughan with The Fabulous Thunderbirds?

Have a great weekend. Be back here tomorrow for more powerful stuff.

Saturday Matinee – Pensen Paletti, Wayne Hancock, Doc Watson & Aerosmith

Saturday, 30 May 2015

THIS is pure awesome. Pensen Paletti [aka Peer Jenson of the Monsters of LeiderMaching] wired up his acoustic guitar and added drum synth keys. Wait for the Theme To Peter Gunn.

Milk Cow Blues” was originally recorded by Sleepy John Estes in 1930. This version is a kinda late night early morning retro country thang performed by Wayne Hancock & Co.  in 2008. Hoy hoy hoy, indeed. Here are two other versions:

Doc Watson was awesome.

Aerosmith did a nice cover of “Milk Cow Blues” that had nothing to do with the 1930 original that I can tell, but at least they worked in some Chuck Berry riffs.

Have a great weekend, folks, and we’ll be back here tomorrow whether you like it or not.

[Note that the Utoobage link for Sleepy John Estes’ “Milk Cow Blues” is not the same song.]

Saturday Matinee – R.I.P. B.B. King (1925-2015)

Saturday, 16 May 2015

BB King

The Blues had fallen out of favor in the U.S. recording market in the 1960s, as it was considered retro and passé. Many talented blues musicians from the ’40s and ’50s were left with few options until British rock bands took notice and revived the genre by covering various classic American blues songs, often without credit, which fomented a resurgence of interest in the original recordings. The British were largely responsible for restarting the careers of such notables as Muddy Waters and Howlin’ Wolf. Even early blues-based rock and rollers Chuck Berry, Little Richard and Bo Diddley got career boosts, and all were more popular in England than they were in the United States at that time.

Riley B. “Blues Boy” King was one of the greatest bluesmen of all time, known for his roaring vocals and understated guitar solos. He paid the cost to be the boss, and this BBC documentary from 1972 is amazing. There’s no posing, no strutting or preening, just straight talk about influences and style in a refreshingly honest manner. There’s no point in posting other B.B. King videos here because this one covers it all.

R.I.P. Mr. King. That’s one hell of a legacy you left us.

Saturday Matinee: Dontcha Be Talmbout Mama

Saturday, 9 May 2015

Squeeze Box” was recorded by The Who in 1975. No sexual innuendo intended they said. Ya, right, I said.

Frank Zappa & The Mothers, Live at The Roxy, 1973. Wait for the slide trombone solo sans trombone. Early polyrhythmic jazz fusion, whether you like it or not.

Mama Told Me Not To Come” was written by Randy Newman for Eric Burden and The Animals who recorded & released it in 1967. Very cool song sung partially in Ebonics. The best known version was by Three Dog Night in 1970.

Mama Said” was recorded by the Shirelles, released in 1961 and became an entirely bitchin’ hit.

Big Mama Thornton was talented and scary at the same time. Even the Chess Brothers said she was nasty, wore scars. Here’s her 1965 rendition of “Hound Dog,” written by Lieber & Stoller.

There’s a little something for everyone on this post. Have a great weekend, and be sure too give your Mamas a great big hug tomorrow. If you don’t, I will.

 

Saturday Matinee – Tributes to Ben E. King, Johnny Cash & The B-52’s

Saturday, 2 May 2015

Tribute to a great singer Ben E. King, who passed away 30 April 2015, as performed by an a cappella group featuring Grandpa Eliott Small.

Prior to his solo career, Ben E. King was a key member of The Drifters, a doo-wop group founded in 1953 and fronted by Clyde McPhatter. King replaced McPhatter as lead singer in 1958, and the New Drifters were born. Most of King’s hits were written by the team of Jerry Lieber and Mike Stoller, prolific songwriters of the time.

Tribute to Johnny Cash (1932-2003) on beer bottles [via].

Tribute to the B-52s by Full Blown Cherry. Yeah, it’s a crappy video, but watch what they pull off. They’re not amateurs, and by 02:50 a roadie has to hold the amp down. Any three-man band that can pull off a Rockabilly Tribute To The Ramones gets my full respect.

Have a great weekend folks, be back here in a few minutes.


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 799 other followers

%d bloggers like this: