Archive for the ‘Saturday Matinee’ Category

Saturday Matinee 1977 – The Tubes, The Sanford-Townsend Band & Manfred Mann’s Earth Band

Saturday, 20 June 2015

The Tubes “WPOD” featuring Fee Waybill as Quay Lewd in 1977. I missed out on seeing them live, but I have a couple of their early albums. “Don’t Touch Me There” was one of my favorites; lotta talent in that band.

I remember that year (and the Winter of 77-78) and it was about that time I realized that I hated a lot of the garbage the rock stations were pumping (czech out the 1977 Top 100 Billboard List. Leo Sayer? Really?) My music preferences went rogue.

However, there are a couple of songs on that list that I secretly liked, like this one:

The Sanford-Townsend Band‘s “Smoke From A Distant Fire” was such an up-beat song, and it got the girls dancing. (Heh – the band was introduced by Helen Reddy.)

Two years later, Rickie Lee Jones recorded an almost identical song chord-wise, “Chuck E.’s In Love,” and I loved that one, too.

In 1975 Aerosmith came out with their classic “Walk This Way” and it climbed all the way up to No. 90 in 1977. Go figger. The only other song on that Billboard List that I remember liking much was this one:

Manfred Mann’s Earth Band‘s version of Bruce Springsteen‘s “Blinded By The Light” was more popular than the original and made it to No. 36 on the Billboard Top 100 for 1977. (BTW, Mann was never the lead  singer. He was the keyboardist.)

Have a great Fathers’ Day Weekend folks, appreciate all that your dad does (or did) for you, and we’ll see you back here tomorrow.

Saturday Matinee – Animals & Mirrors, The Doghouse, The Greg Johnson Set & The Fabulous Thunderbirds

Saturday, 6 June 2015

Animals and mirrors [via].

Beware of The Doghouse. Been there. I overlooked the first Valentine’s Day post-marriage as I considered it to be a dating holiday. I ate damp corrugated cardboard for months [via].

The Greg Johnson Set is a band from New Zealand, sounds like a traditional Irish band, performs “People Can’t Talk In This Town” from 1992. Somehow the concept of Freedom of Speech is being quietly vanquished [via].

Lets lighten it up a tad. How ’bout some great rippin’ by Jimmie Vaughan with The Fabulous Thunderbirds?

Have a great weekend. Be back here tomorrow for more powerful stuff.

Saturday Matinee – Pensen Paletti, Wayne Hancock, Doc Watson & Aerosmith

Saturday, 30 May 2015

THIS is pure awesome. Pensen Paletti [aka Peer Jenson of the Monsters of LeiderMaching] wired up his acoustic guitar and added drum synth keys. Wait for the Theme To Peter Gunn.

Milk Cow Blues” was originally recorded by Sleepy John Estes in 1930. This version is a kinda late night early morning retro country thang performed by Wayne Hancock & Co.  in 2008. Hoy hoy hoy, indeed. Here are two other versions:

Doc Watson was awesome.

Aerosmith did a nice cover of “Milk Cow Blues” that had nothing to do with the 1930 original that I can tell, but at least they worked in some Chuck Berry riffs.

Have a great weekend, folks, and we’ll be back here tomorrow whether you like it or not.

[Note that the Utoobage link for Sleepy John Estes’ “Milk Cow Blues” is not the same song.]

Saturday Matinee – R.I.P. B.B. King (1925-2015)

Saturday, 16 May 2015

BB King

The Blues had fallen out of favor in the U.S. recording market in the 1960s, as it was considered retro and passé. Many talented blues musicians from the ’40s and ’50s were left with few options until British rock bands took notice and revived the genre by covering various classic American blues songs, often without credit, which fomented a resurgence of interest in the original recordings. The British were largely responsible for restarting the careers of such notables as Muddy Waters and Howlin’ Wolf. Even early blues-based rock and rollers Chuck Berry, Little Richard and Bo Diddley got career boosts, and all were more popular in England than they were in the United States at that time.

Riley B. “Blues Boy” King was one of the greatest bluesmen of all time, known for his roaring vocals and understated guitar solos. He paid the cost to be the boss, and this BBC documentary from 1972 is amazing. There’s no posing, no strutting or preening, just straight talk about influences and style in a refreshingly honest manner. There’s no point in posting other B.B. King videos here because this one covers it all.

R.I.P. Mr. King. That’s one hell of a legacy you left us.

Saturday Matinee: Dontcha Be Talmbout Mama

Saturday, 9 May 2015

Squeeze Box” was recorded by The Who in 1975. No sexual innuendo intended they said. Ya, right, I said.

Frank Zappa & The Mothers, Live at The Roxy, 1973. Wait for the slide trombone solo sans trombone. Early polyrhythmic jazz fusion, whether you like it or not.

Mama Told Me Not To Come” was written by Randy Newman for Eric Burden and The Animals who recorded & released it in 1967. Very cool song sung partially in Ebonics. The best known version was by Three Dog Night in 1970.

Mama Said” was recorded by the Shirelles, released in 1961 and became an entirely bitchin’ hit.

Big Mama Thornton was talented and scary at the same time. Even the Chess Brothers said she was nasty, wore scars. Here’s her 1965 rendition of “Hound Dog,” written by Lieber & Stoller.

There’s a little something for everyone on this post. Have a great weekend, and be sure too give your Mamas a great big hug tomorrow. If you don’t, I will.

 

Saturday Matinee – Tributes to Ben E. King, Johnny Cash & The B-52’s

Saturday, 2 May 2015

Tribute to a great singer Ben E. King, who passed away 30 April 2015, as performed by an a cappella group featuring Grandpa Eliott Small.

Prior to his solo career, Ben E. King was a key member of The Drifters, a doo-wop group founded in 1953 and fronted by Clyde McPhatter. King replaced McPhatter as lead singer in 1958, and the New Drifters were born. Most of King’s hits were written by the team of Jerry Lieber and Mike Stoller, prolific songwriters of the time.

Tribute to Johnny Cash (1932-2003) on beer bottles [via].

Tribute to the B-52s by Full Blown Cherry. Yeah, it’s a crappy video, but watch what they pull off. They’re not amateurs, and by 02:50 a roadie has to hold the amp down. Any three-man band that can pull off a Rockabilly Tribute To The Ramones gets my full respect.

Have a great weekend folks, be back here in a few minutes.

Saturday Matinee – The Specials, Seasick Steve & The J. Geils Band

Saturday, 25 April 2015

The Specials live at PinkPop 28 May 2012.

Pinkpop Festival or PINKPOP is a large, annual music festival held at Landgraaf, the Netherlands. It is usually held on the Pentecost weekend (Pinksteren in Dutch, hence the name). —Wiki

With the exception of The Specials and Seasick Steve, most of the bands on that line up sucked big green donkeys, and I really tried to find one, just one, that didn’t suck big green donkeys.

Seasick Steve played the same day. Pure roots rock blues with homemade steel. The guy’s a killer, and he knew that the other bands (except for The Specials) sucked big green donkeys, too. But then there was that bar band fronted by someone named Bruce.

This bar band was way more fun.

Have a great weekend, folks. Be back here tomorrow for more stupid.

Saturday Matinee – Cool Paper Tricks, The Fibonacci Series & Iron Horse Bluegrass

Saturday, 18 April 2015

Cool tricks you can do with paper. It reminds me of Doodling In Math Class.

The Fibonacci Series explained graphically.

Killer version of Elton John‘s “Rocket Man” by Iron Horse Bluegrass.

Have a great weekend, folks. I’m sleeping in tomorrow.

Saturday Matinee – The Lost Thing, The Undisputed Truth & The Melbourne Ska Orchestra

Saturday, 11 April 2015

The Lost Thing” is an animated adaption of a picture book illustrated and written by Shaun Tan in 2000.

The Undisputed Truth‘s version of “Smiling Faces” [via].

I never realized it, but “The Theme To Get Smart” is perfect for a ska rendition. Here’s the The Melbourne Ska Orchestra who did just that.

Have a great weekend, folks, and for those of us who are self-employed, it’s time to cough up some b*ks to the IRS f*ks.

Saturday Matinee – Pushing Hay, The Ballad of Holland Island House & The Tom Stormy Trio featuring Rhythm Sophie

Saturday, 4 April 2015

Pushing hay [via]. Makes me itchy just watching it.

“The Ballad of Holland House” is based upon a true story.

Holland Island sits in Chesapeake Bay, near Wenona, Maryland. The five-mile-long island was settled in the 1600s, and at one time had a population of 360 people and 70 buildings. Erosion ate away at the island, which sat on silt and clay, and the residents moved away between 1914 and 1918. The island’s church was moved in 1922, and only one house remained standing. It was built in 1888. For decades, the water ate away at the island, and the last remaining house finally collapsed in October of 2010. What’s left of the island is now a marsh, home to hundreds of sea birds. See pictures of the island and the house -and the cemetery- at the Baltimore Sun [via].

How ’bout some retro rockabilly from Budapest?

The Tom Stormy Trio (featuring Leipzig’s Miss Rhythm Sophie) is just the thing to wrap up this edition of The Saturday Matinee.

Have a great Passover / Easter, folks.


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