Posts Tagged ‘Saturday Matinee’

Saturday Matinee – Louis Jordan, Little Walter & Charles E. Anderson

Saturday, 3 October 2015

Louis Jordan‘s “Let The Good Times Roll” is a bonafide 1940s classic and features some nice legs, too.

Little Walter reinvented blues harmonica in the 1950s. Read more about him here. (Guess where James Cotton & Magic Dick Salwitz got their licks?)

Charles Edward Anderson  is a legend, made a name for himself by transforming traditional blues into what’s now considered classic Rock-N-Roll, and he did it by electrifying it and changing the tempo. That’s not news to anyone, but it was news to me when he released his best album, “London Berry Blues” in October 1972 and played T-Bone Walker‘s “Mean ‘Ol World” straight up. Yep, I’m talking about Chuck Berry.

Have a great weekend, folks, and remember that Gun-Free Zones only assist those deviants who choose to commit atrocities because they know that no one is able to shoot back.

Saturday Matinee – Best Coast, The Ray Beats & Bishop Bullwinkle

Saturday, 5 September 2015

So I axed Bunkessa about the song she played last weekend on our patio hi-fi. She said it was “Our Deal” by Best Coast, a Beach Goth band from L.A. Never heard of the group nor the genre, but so what. I like the retro sound. [The video accompaniment is a Cliff’s Notes mime version of West Side Story.]

Okay, so what to post next? Let’s keep the retro thang going.

The Ray Beats were kinda Chantays, kinda Ventures, kinda Dick Dale and kinda NY punk in the late 70s/early 80s.  In other words, kinda young, kinda wow.

Here’s another talent who dodged my radar: Bishop Bullwinkle and “Hell 2 Da Naw Naw.” Apparently it went viral in August and I’m late to the party [via]. Dude’s got a great message.

Have a great weekend folks. See you back here tomorrow, even if you’re headed out on a 3-day family road trip to See Ruby Falls.

Saturday Matinee – Mott The Hoople, The SAHB & Rory Gallagher,

Saturday, 8 August 2015

Mott The Hoople, 1973.

The Sensational Alex Harvey Band, 1973.

Rory Gallagher, 1979.

Yeah I was on a 70’s rock vibe tonight. Have a great weekend, folks, and we’ll see you back here tomorrow. –Bunk






Saturday Matinee 1977 – The Tubes, The Sanford-Townsend Band & Manfred Mann’s Earth Band

Saturday, 20 June 2015

The Tubes “WPOD” featuring Fee Waybill as Quay Lewd in 1977. I missed out on seeing them live, but I have a couple of their early albums. “Don’t Touch Me There” was one of my favorites; lotta talent in that band.

I remember that year (and the Winter of 77-78) and it was about that time I realized that I hated a lot of the garbage the rock stations were pumping (czech out the 1977 Top 100 Billboard List. Leo Sayer? Really?) My music preferences went rogue.

However, there are a couple of songs on that list that I secretly liked, like this one:

The Sanford-Townsend Band‘s “Smoke From A Distant Fire” was such an up-beat song, and it got the girls dancing. (Heh – the band was introduced by Helen Reddy.)

Two years later, Rickie Lee Jones recorded an almost identical song chord-wise, “Chuck E.’s In Love,” and I loved that one, too.

In 1975 Aerosmith came out with their classic “Walk This Way” and it climbed all the way up to No. 90 in 1977. Go figger. The only other song on that Billboard List that I remember liking much was this one:

Manfred Mann’s Earth Band‘s version of Bruce Springsteen‘s “Blinded By The Light” was more popular than the original and made it to No. 36 on the Billboard Top 100 for 1977. (BTW, Mann was never the lead  singer. He was the keyboardist.)

Have a great Fathers’ Day Weekend folks, appreciate all that your dad does (or did) for you, and we’ll see you back here tomorrow.

Saturday Matinee – Animals & Mirrors, The Doghouse, The Greg Johnson Set & The Fabulous Thunderbirds

Saturday, 6 June 2015

Animals and mirrors [via].

Beware of The Doghouse. Been there. I overlooked the first Valentine’s Day post-marriage as I considered it to be a dating holiday. I ate damp corrugated cardboard for months [via].

The Greg Johnson Set is a band from New Zealand, sounds like a traditional Irish band, performs “People Can’t Talk In This Town” from 1992. Somehow the concept of Freedom of Speech is being quietly vanquished [via].

Lets lighten it up a tad. How ’bout some great rippin’ by Jimmie Vaughan with The Fabulous Thunderbirds?

Have a great weekend. Be back here tomorrow for more powerful stuff.

Saturday Matinee – Pensen Paletti, Wayne Hancock, Doc Watson & Aerosmith

Saturday, 30 May 2015

THIS is pure awesome. Pensen Paletti [aka Peer Jenson of the Monsters of LeiderMaching] wired up his acoustic guitar and added drum synth keys. Wait for the Theme To Peter Gunn.

Milk Cow Blues” was originally recorded by Sleepy John Estes in 1930. This version is a kinda late night early morning retro country thang performed by Wayne Hancock & Co.  in 2008. Hoy hoy hoy, indeed. Here are two other versions:

Doc Watson was awesome.

Aerosmith did a nice cover of “Milk Cow Blues” that had nothing to do with the 1930 original that I can tell, but at least they worked in some Chuck Berry riffs.

Have a great weekend, folks, and we’ll be back here tomorrow whether you like it or not.

[Note that the Utoobage link for Sleepy John Estes’ “Milk Cow Blues” is not the same song.]

Saturday Matinee – Tributes to Ben E. King, Johnny Cash & The B-52’s

Saturday, 2 May 2015

Tribute to a great singer Ben E. King, who passed away 30 April 2015, as performed by an a cappella group featuring Grandpa Eliott Small.

Prior to his solo career, Ben E. King was a key member of The Drifters, a doo-wop group founded in 1953 and fronted by Clyde McPhatter. King replaced McPhatter as lead singer in 1958, and the New Drifters were born. Most of King’s hits were written by the team of Jerry Lieber and Mike Stoller, prolific songwriters of the time.

Tribute to Johnny Cash (1932-2003) on beer bottles [via].

Tribute to the B-52s by Full Blown Cherry. Yeah, it’s a crappy video, but watch what they pull off. They’re not amateurs, and by 02:50 a roadie has to hold the amp down. Any three-man band that can pull off a Rockabilly Tribute To The Ramones gets my full respect.

Have a great weekend folks, be back here in a few minutes.

Saturday Matinee – Lee Morse; Doc Watson, David Grisman & Jack Lawrence, & Jimmie Rogers

Saturday, 6 December 2014

Here’s a description of Lee Morse [via]:

“She was 5 feet tall. She was less than 100 lbs “soaking wet”. She spent her childhood in Oregon and Idaho yet was proud of her family’s Southern roots. She could hunt and fish and, if you deserved it, she could punch your lights out! She was Lee Morse, one of the most popular female recording artists during the Jazz Age 20’s and 30’s. And, she is worth remembering.” ~Ian House

Doc Watson, David “Dawg” Grisman and Jack Lawrence live in 1995. Lawrence was the late Watson’s accompianist for many years.

“My Blue Eyed Jane” was written by Lulu Belle White and Jimmie Rogers, first recorded by Jimmy Rogers with Bob Sawyer’s Jazz Band in 1930.

Jimmie Rogers (1897-1933) is considered the Father of Country Music for his long-lasting music influences, worked the railroad until he contracted tuberculosis in 1925. While fighting off the disease and unable to perform physical labor, he returned to his original love, writing and performing, until he succumbed at the age of 35.

Sadly, there was a vaccine to combat TB as early as 1921, but according to Wiki it wasn’t widely available in the U.S. or Europe until after WWII. Rogers also sang about his affliction in “TB Blues.”

Here’s Jimmie Rogers in the Columbia Pictures short “The Singing Brakeman” from 1930.

That’s it for this edition of The Saturday Matinee. Have a great weekend, folks.



Saturday Matinee – Who Was Sloopy?

Saturday, 29 November 2014
Dorothy Sloop

Dorothy “Dottie” Sloop (1913 – 1998)

There’s a bizarre history to that familiar song credited to The McCoys, and it traces to Dorothy Sloop of Steubenville Ohio who became a New Orleans singer and piano player with the stage name “Sloopy.” The song was originally recorded by The Vibrations in 1963, predating the McCoys’ version:

So how did a 60s soul group from LA decide to sing about a girl who moved to New Orleans?

“Sloopy” was Dorothy Sloop, a Bourbon Street piano player. Born Sept. 26, 1913, in Steubenville, she performed at a New Orleans nightspot under the stage name Sloopy.

‘Hang on Sloopy’ was written by Bert Russell Berns and Wes Farrell, two New York City songwriters. Berns also wrote The Isley Brothers and Beatles hit Twist and Shout. Farrell went on to become the musical brains behind the Partridge Family.

The song was originally recorded as My Girl Sloopy by the Los Angeles R&B vocal group the Vibrations. It debuted in April 1964 in the Top 40 of the Billboard pop chart, where it spent five weeks and reached No. 26.

A rock version, ‘Hang on Sloopy,’ was recorded by the McCoys, a Dayton garage band led by Celina native Rick Zehringer. Locally, the band was known as Rick and the Raiders, but it changed its name to avoid confusion with chart-toppers Paul Revere and the Raiders. Hang On Sloopy debuted in September 1965 in the Top 40 of the Billboard pop chart, where it spent 11 weeks and reached No. 1.

Rick Zehringer later changed his name to Rick Derringer and became one of the top rock guitarists and producers of the 1970s. He recorded with the Edgar Winter Group and scored a 1974 solo hit with Rock and Roll, Hootchie Koo. [More at this source]

"Dottie" Sloop recorded an album, "Sloopy Time" Featuring Dixie and Sloopy, in 1957 with Yvonne "Dixie" Fasnacht, a jazz vocalist and clarinetist.

“Dottie” Sloop recorded an album, “Sloopy Time” Featuring Dixie and Sloopy, in 1957 with Yvonne “Dixie” Fasnacht, a jazz vocalist and clarinetist.

“Dixie” Fasnacht operated a bar called Dixie’s Bar of Music on Bourbon Street in New Orleans. It was there that Dorothy’s acquaintance and co-writer of “Hang On Sloopy” Bert Berns-Russell found the inspiration for the song. During problems with the sound equipment and a crowd getting rowdy, he heard a regular call out to her “Hang on, Sloopy!” [Source]

I couldn’t find a recording of either Dottie Sloop or Yvonne “Dixie” Fasnacht, but there has to be a copy of the album in someone’s basement somewhere. One more piece of trivia: Ohio is the only State to have an Official State Rock Song.

The Best Damn Band In The Land adopted “Hang On Sloopy” as a signature song for the times when OSU was down a few points, and their a capella version is classic.

Have a great holiday weekend, folks.

Saturday Matinee – Stan Kenton, Miles Davis plays Herbie Hancock & Los Lobos Rocks.

Saturday, 15 November 2014

Stan Kenton‘s version of “Malaguena” was amazing.

Herbie Hancock‘s “Watermelon Man” was an instant jazz classic in 1962, and this 1991 version features Miles Davis. Very cool.

Los Lobos son impresionantes como sus musica retros. Got that?

Have a great weekend peeps, and we’ll have more fun stuff coming up tomorrow. Promise.



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