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Archive for the ‘Cephalopods’ Category

Here’s Looking At You, Squid.

Thursday, 6 September 2018

That one is 14-feet long. Giant squid can grow to over three times that size.

[Found here. Related posts here.]

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Bigass Ammonite Fossil is not a Bigass Ammonite Fossil

Monday, 18 July 2016

Ammonite

Yep, that looks like a bigass prehistoric ammonite fossil, and it’s not a snail fossil as the caption states.

Ammonites are perhaps the most widely known fossil, possessing the typically ribbed spiral-form shell as pictured above. These creatures lived in the seas between 240 – 65 million years ago, when they became extinct along with the dinosaurs. The name ‘ammonite’ (usually lower-case) originates from the Greek Ram-horned god called Ammon. Ammonites belong to a group of predators known as cephalopods, which includes their living relatives the octopus, squid, cuttlefish and nautilus [via].

I found the top image (with the erroneous caption) in here, and wondered about the story behind it. Since fossils are typically embedded in rock and I didn’t see any hole or excavation, something seemed off.

Ammonite Replica 2

Ammonite fossils are common, but are rarely larger than about 9 inches in diameter. Sure, some larger species have been found, but why wasn’t this one encased in plaster, crated up and shipped to an archeological museum? How could something so heavy and brittle stay in one piece while being tilted up? How could four guys lift it, let alone one?

A Tineye search brought me to the source –  a 2005 documentary filmed in Lyme Regis, England for the BBC series “Journey of Life.”

“This giant ammonite was actually a replica that we used to show how big ammonites could grow. Made of polystyrene it squeaked as we rolled it down the beach. The look of gob-smack on the faces of Jurassic Coast fossil collectors was priceless!”
Paul Williams, 3 September 2013.

This “fossil” was a prop, and it had a cameo role in Episode 1: Seas of Life.

[Full story with photos here.]

Perhaps you’re wondering why I suddenly found an interest in large fabricated ammonite fossils. It’s because I saw that top picture and wanted to do this with it:

Ammonite Beach Spin

Kid Squid

Wednesday, 23 October 2013

squid costume

This is entirely awesome.

[Found here.]

Armed Furniture – A Table without legs

Thursday, 17 October 2013

Cephalopod Table

Bronze n’ glass table by Isaac Krauss. I pity the husband who gets to move it for vacuuming – it weighs 500 lbs.

[Found here via here.]

Great Calamary 1873

Monday, 8 April 2013

Great Calamary 1873

[Image found here; we also have a nice collection of cephalopodia.]

The .Gif Friday Post No. 248 – Carrion-Naut, Banjo Heads & Hungry Dogs

Friday, 5 October 2012


[Found here, here and here.]

Whack

Sunday, 15 May 2011

Tip of the Tarboosh to Mongoose for this.

Cephalopod Gas Passing

Monday, 21 June 2010

There’s a happy patient. One squeeze and she’s happy; two squeezes  and she’s dancing on the table; three squeezes and she’s prepared to serve in congress.

[Found here. Nice one, McGoo.]

Saturday Matinee – The Tick, Phi, Ken Nordine, Bootsy & The Zappas

Saturday, 3 April 2010

The Tick came and went, but lives on the Utoobage. Here’s Part 1 of my favorite 1/2 hour episode: “The Funeral.”  The next two parts are here and here.

Speaking of nature and mathema-Ticks:

The concept of Phi, graphically illustrated. [Found here.] Ken Nordine had a great take on the Fibonacci Sequence as well:

Bootsy’s New Rubber Band’s got a nice groovejam going with a left handed shredder.

Here’s a fun compilation, “Peavey Nation,” by the Sons of Zappa, featuring a cameo by Dick Clark.

Have a great Easter weekend, folks.

Oct

Thursday, 1 October 2009

octopus_hanuman-090507

Saddened by the loss of his long-time hunting friend Inqui, Suaciq O’Neil mourns in front of a Fuji Kōgaku camera with a 50mm lens using 400+ASA film pushed to 1000, with a manually reduced f-stop that he mentally calculated as being in the realm of either 20/3×0.5, 21/3×0.5, 22/3×0.5, 23/3×0.5, or 24/3×0.5, and with an octopod for stability in the frozen arctic wind.

Watch out where the huskies go,” he warned.

[Image found here. Related posts here.]


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