Posts Tagged ‘North Korea’

The Korean War – 25 June1950 to Present

Thursday, 25 June 2020

The war came suddenly. It was a sunny Sunday morning on 25 June 1950, when the peace was shattered by an agitated radio announcer screaming that there was an all-out attack by the North Korean army all along the 38th parallel. Within two days, the distant rumbles of cannons could be heard from our house in Seoul, and on the third day North Korean tanks and soldiers appeared on our streets. It was incredible. The radio had been repeating President Syngman Rhee’s message that brave South Korean army soldiers were repulsing the communist army and that the capital city never would be abandoned to the invaders.
[…]
The bridges across the Han River—the only escape routes—were blown up by the retreating South Korean army. There was no question that it was a full-scale invasion. The communist occupation of Seoul lasted for 90 days while the North Korean thrust expanded rapidly southward down the narrow peninsula, despite the U.S. and United Nations participation in the conflict.

The North Koreans in Seoul now engaged in methodical hunts for able-bodied men to be impressed into their various “volunteer” units. I moved nine times from relatives’ houses to friends’ places to stay a step ahead of the occupation soldiers—who were spreading their dragnets ever wider. We heard rumors about “kangaroo courts” held at city squares where any “reactionaries” were bludgeoned to death. I was undoubtedly a “reactionary” by their definition. For the first time I knew fear and hunger, as food was extremely scarce. This was the darkest and most helpless period in my life. I was convinced that all the shocking events were caused by the communist aggression. Along with some schoolmates, I decided to do my part in defending my homeland. – John K. C. Oh

Mr. Oh’s account from USNI Naval History Magazine June 2000, Volume 14 Number 3 [read more here].

Image of members of the “Frozen Chosin” found here.

North Korea celebrates 50th Anniversary of the capture of the USS Pueblo

Thursday, 25 January 2018


Captured crewmembers of the USS PUEBLO giving the “Hawaiian Good Luck Sign,” 1968.

[USNI News 24 January 2018.]

North Korea celebrated the 50th anniversary of the USS Pueblo (AGER-2) incident on Tuesday via broadcasts on state television and in an international press statement.

In 1968, the North Korean Navy captured the signals intelligence ship USS Pueblo (AGER-2) and its crew of 82 sailors. The sailors suffered starvation and torture and were used for propaganda purposes for almost a year before a release was negotiated in December of 1968.
[…]
Pueblo’s crew resisted when possible, most notably by frequently raising their middle fingers to ruin propaganda photo ops staged by the North Koreans, telling their captors the gesture was considered a “Hawaiian Good Luck Sign,” according to the Navy investigation. The crew was severely beaten near the end of their confinement when the North Koreans learned the gesture’s true meaning.

[More at the link above.]

 

Facebook in North Korea

Wednesday, 3 May 2017

Better click “like.”

[Found here.]

Introducing The 2015 MultiCar BS Coupe

Sunday, 4 January 2015
The 3-wheeled MultiCar has been around for decades and is featured on many traffic reports. Manufactured by Pyeongwa Motors of North Korea, The 2015 MultiCar BS Coupe has many improvements over previous models, including tempered glass, a front-wheel disc brake and reverse-engineered Carter carburetors. Handling is somewhat below par, and there is no insurance coverage available to date. If price is a concern and replacement parts are not a concern, then the MultiCar may be just the right choice for you. [Strutts News Services]

Manufactured by Pyeongwa Motors of North Korea, the 3-wheeled MultiCar has been around for decades and is featured in many traffic reports. The 2015 MultiCar BS Coupe has many improvements over previous models, including tempered glass, a front-wheel disc brake and a reverse-engineered Carter carburetor. Handling is somewhat below par, and there is no insurance coverage available to date. If price is a concern and availability of replacement parts is not, the MultiCar may be just the right choice for you.
[Strutts News Services]

 

Thanks to the glory of communism, North Korea has what might be one of the lowest rates of car ownership in the world. Although the government doesn’t release official stats, the best estimate is that there are fewer than 30,000 vehicles on the road—in a country of nearly 24 million people. (Officially, private citizens can’t own cars, but those with government ties manage to.) You are more likely to know somebody with a private jet than a North Korean is to know somebody with a car.
[…]
Although a minute segment of the population owns cars, the rate of growth is significant. In fact, in 2007, cars were deemed prevalent enough that Kim Jong-Il ordered the confiscation of all Japanese-built vehicles.
[Via Pyeonghwa Motors.]

I suppose North Korea could set worldwide standards and opt for energy-efficient eco-vehicles that can be recharged overnight, but you’d have to drive to Pyongyang every night to do it and drive back the next day.

“Socialism/Fascism/Communism works. It’s just that it’s never been properly enforced.” –A random liberal.

LMAO.


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