Archive for the ‘Saturday Matinee’ Category

Saturday Matinee – Heavy Slabs in Tasmania, Puddles Painting Party, Manualist Extraordinaire & Fishbone

Saturday, 27 August 2016

August 2016 – “Tasmania’s most famous wave comes to life to launch the Australian winter with a roar. When the southern hemisphere starts to rumble and shake under the weight of wild winter weather, The Stern, out there on the south-eastern tip of Tasmania, bears the full brunt of the conditions.”

[Found here.]

Found here. Yeah, it’s cool for the first minute or so, but hey. I’d rather watch this guy’s stuff.

Dude is awesome.

One of my all time ska favorites. Fishbone kicks it in 2013.

Have a great weekend, folks, and we’ll see what happens tomorrow.

Saturday Matinee – “Olymic Sailing,” The Olympics & The Jive Five

Saturday, 20 August 2016

Oh yes he does, you Manc poofter. He knows exactly what he’s talking about. “Olymic” indeed.

The Olympics sounded like every other group that performed a Leiber & Stoller song and then faded away to oblivion, but they didn’t.  Let’s do the HullyGully.

The Jive Five did a song called “Hully-Gully Callin’ Time” that was cool, but this was probably their biggest hit.

Her name was Suki, his name was Jack or Bob or something. Yeah, I love that stuff, even if it’s a crappy video with poor sound quality.

Have a great weekend, folks. See you tomorrow, same Bunk Time, same Bunk Channel.

Bonus Featurette: Hollywood or Bus

Saturday, 13 August 2016

I blame Hanna-Barbera [via].

Saturday Matinee – John Prine (and CSN&Y)

Saturday, 13 August 2016

That was the first John Prine song I ever heard, and I heard it before I knew who John Prine was, er, I mean is. (The first time I heard his name was in an introduction to a song the late Steve Goodman performed (and co-wrote with Prine) that he described as an attempt to write the best country song ever.)

Prine’s song “Souvenirs” is one of my favorites, it’s been covered by more than a few, and I may have posted it here before.

And here’s another Prine classic performed with Iris DeMent.

“So, Bunk why all these sad sentimental songs?” you ask?

Iron Fist passed away last night, and although I never met him (we only “knew” each other on the internet), his struggle to live reminded me of my own father’s demise last year. These songs are for Mrs. Fist, aka Velvet Glove.

I suppose the meaning of life is to enjoy the company of those who are still around. Rock on, my friends.


“Life ain’t no-how permanent, son.” –Pogo


Saturday Matinee – Brazil, The Olympics, Jackie Phelps & Jimmy Riddle, and Tuba Skinny

Saturday, 6 August 2016

I was looking for a live performance of “Brazil” (perhaps by Xavier Cugat) to commemorate the Competitions of the Grecian Gods, but instead we must settle for The Theme Song to Terry Gilliam’s Brazil as performed by Geoffrey Muldaur. He was famous for marrying Maria Grazia Rosa Domenica D’Amato who recorded some popular songs in 1973 about putting camels to bed, and another one about feeling her leg.

There’s no live performance for that one, so I looked for some more Olympics-themed stuff.

The Olympics sound a lot like another Lieber & Stoller product to me, but so what.

Yep. There be the Olympians of Eefin’ and Hambone, Jimmy Riddle & Jackie Phelps.

Let’s go back to Maria Grazia Rosa Domenica D’Amato (aka Maria Muldaur) and the leg feeling stuff. What a sultry voice.

This version by Tuba Skinny is a bit closer to Blue Lu Barker’s 1946 original.

Have a great weekend, folks, and we’ll be back tomorrow with more stuff that’s too hot to handle and too cold to hold.

Saturday Matinee – Robin Trower, Procul Harum & Clarence Gatemouth Brown

Saturday, 30 July 2016

Robin Trower‘s album Bridge of Sighs was a gold record in 1974. (According to Trower, the title song was named for a racehorse that was named after il Ponte dei Sospiri).

Procul Harum in 2013(?) playing their 1967 hit “Whiter Shade of Pale,” featuring Gary Brooker, Keith Reid, Matthew Fisher, Robin Trower, Chris Copping.

Okay, the slow dance is over. Let’s crank it up.

Clarence Gatemouth Brown (1924-2005) burns through “Pressure Cooker” and “Up Jumped The Devil.” Amazing musician, and his 1981 album “Alright Again!” is one of my favorites.

Have a great weekend folks, wherever you are.

 

Saturday Matinee – Dinosaurs, Ted Hawkins, Playing For Change, Steve Ray Vaughan & Johnny Copeland

Saturday, 23 July 2016

Dinosaurs are always fun, and this video has a great cast of relative unknowns. It’s over an hour long, but that’s just a day in dinotime.

Ted Hawkins (1936-1995) had more success in the UK than the US, although he had a local fan base in Venice Beach CA where he was a popular busker. Check out his background at the link.

[h/t Charlie L.]

This version of Stevie Wonder’s “Higher Ground” is fascinating, as it appears that all the players recorded remotely. Playing For Change is not a band, it’s an organization based in Venice California that records musicians from around the world, and is dedicated to creating and supporting music schools particularly in developing countries.

Haven’t heard any Stevie Ray Vaughan in a while, so here he is with fellow Texan Johnny Copeland, live At Montreux 1985.

Have a great weekend, folks. Stay cool.

Saturday Matinee – NASA 1961, Jason D. Williams, Sonny Terry & Brownie McGhee, & The Yonder Mountain String Band

Saturday, 16 July 2016

This magnificent feat was engineered with slide rules, and it amounted to blasting a giant bullet containing a human into the sky, then recovering both it and Alan Shepard intact [via]. Those early astronauts had big brass ones, and the creepy music made it even better. (John Glenn appears at 04:15.)

Speaking of Great Balls of Fire, here’s the next best thing to The Killer. Jason D. Williams pounds the ivories with Sticks McGhee‘s 1947 classic “Drinkin’ Wine Spo-dee-o-dee.”

Spodiodi was street slang for chipping in for a cheap bottle of fortified wine in a brown paper bag and sharing it with your buddies. Urban Dictionary says “Spodiodi” is a glass of wine spiked with bourbon. Nah.

BTW, Sticks McGhee was the brother of Brownie McGhee, who partnered with harmonica player Sonny Terry known for his harmonica whooping. “Key to the Highway” was covered by many, including what’s his name. That famous British guy. You know. That guy.

Here’s some Easy-On-The-Ear-Holes stuff from The Yonder Mountain String Band. They need some authentic whooping in my opinion. Maybe even some eefin.

Have a great weekend, folks, and be glad that you’re not in Turkey.

Saturday Matinee – USS America, Accidents & Blunders, Johnny Winter w/ Popa Chubby

Saturday, 9 July 2016

Cool timelapse of USS America LHA-6 arriving in Pearl Harbor for RIMPAC 2016 (not to be confused with the aircraft carrier USS America CV-66 which was decommissioned in 1996) [via].

[Found here.] Warning: Too dark for young kids.

Here’s something a bit lighter.

Johnny Winter, with Popa Chubby, Frank Latorre & The King Bees,  at the B.B. King Blues Club in NYC on 23 February 2014.

Have a great weekend, folks.

Saturday Matinee – LAZAR, Ry Cooder & Black Country Communion

Saturday, 25 June 2016

Unusual animation from the 1980s. It reminds me of Terry Gilliam‘s “Brazil” from the same period, and it’s apropos, given yesterday’s #Brexit vote in the UK.

Ry Cooder‘s version of Johnny Cash‘s “Get Rhythm” (from the album of the same name) is introduced by Harry Dean Stanton. Cooder’s swamp rock take of Elvis’ “All Shook Up” is killer.

PeteR recommended Black Country Communion featuring Glenn Hughes, so here he is, there they are, and here we go.

Have a great weekend, folks, and if we’re not rockin’ tomorrow we’ll be rollin’.


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