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Posts Tagged ‘video’

Saturday Matinee – St. Paul & The Broken Bones, Booker T. & The M.G.’s, & The Knitts

Saturday, 20 May 2017

Wow. I haven’t heard stuff like this since the Blues Brothers promoted it. Okay I have, but not as far as you know.

St. Paul & The Broken Bones does retro soul / R&B, with a sound that is pure Stax/Volt from the Big O days. They’re from Birmingham, not Memphis, and I’d post a direct link to their website, but it froze up my computer twice (you’ve been warned).

Let’s continue our stroll down Soul Street, shall we?

Booker T. & The M.G.’s were about as close to the center of the Soul Circuit as anyone. (Members of San Francisco’s CCR were in the wings during this performance taking notes).

Okay, let’s jam the gears. How many influences can you cover in one song?

Bunkessa volunteers at a local radio station occasionally, and The Knitts showed up to play live in-studio. The band is getting a following, have some tours lined up (and they know she has a Class B license).

Have a great weekend, folks. See you back here tomorrow for more fun stuff.

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Saturday Matinee – Steve ‘n’ Seagulls, Little Feat & Buddy Guy

Saturday, 13 May 2017

Steve N’ Seagulls is a band from Finland that records bluegrass covers of various heavy metal groups (including AC/DC) and they’re entirely awesome.

Little Feat was (and is) an underrated band that didn’t get as much attention as they deserved, despite Jimmy Page’s endorsement. Here they are with Emmy Lou Harris and Bonnie Raitt on backup vocals playing their 1973 hit “Dixie Chicken.” Great swamp rock.  (Check out the lead-in to their 1979 album “Down On The Farm” for a grin.)

The embedded title says it all, but the vid starts late and cuts off too soon. Jimi Hendrix studied the masters, including Buddy Guy.

Buddy Guy paid tribute to complimented both Hendrix and Cream at the Byron Bay Blues Fest in April 2014.

Have a great weekend, folks, and don’t forget Yo Mama Day.

Saturday Matinee – Tito Puente, Mickey Hart & Todd Rundgren

Saturday, 6 May 2017

Pure percussion by Tito Puente e Los TropiJazz All Stars. I could listen to this stuff all day.

Decades ago (in college) we attended an off-campus house party that seemed to have a live band. I asked the host about it and he replied, “That’s the Rhythm Section. They’re in the basement.” So I went downstairs and found people taking turns on vinyl trash cans, bottles, cans, buckets, with wooden dowels and spoons, and it all sounded great as it morphed, non-stop. No electronics, just stoners people grooving on impromptu syncopated rhythms.

Micky Hart‘s Planet Drum project got my ear as well. Hard to say what musical instrument came first, the bone flute or the drum. I’d guess the latter, because you can bang on anything to create a tempo, and everything else is secondary. (Vocals don’t count unless you’re talmbout Hollerin.)

Then of course there’s this RetroSka classic:

Have a great weekend, folks. We’ll be back here tomorrow whether you like it or not.

Messerschmitt 1950

Wednesday, 26 April 2017

messerschmitt-1950

Barely five years after Germany’s unconditional surrender in WWII, and they were still in business.

[Found here.]

Saturday Matinee – The Growlers, Leo Bud Welch & J. Geils

Saturday, 15 April 2017

Did I post this before? I still like this song by The Growlers. It’s retro rock on many levels.

Leo “Bud” Welch is now into his eighties and only recently began his recording career. Here’s his website. Classic Delta blues mixed with the Chicago sound.

RIP John Geils.

That clip is from 1972 and features the classic J. Geils Band line up. I didn’t find out about those guys until a couple of years later when I got hooked on the sound and the fun. None of the players in his band stood out as heavy hitters individually, but as a group they kicked ass, with Danny Klein, Magic Dick Salwitz, Stephen Jo Bladd, Peter Wolf and Seth Justman. They lost me in 1980 with their move to pop rock.

Have a great weekend, folks, and remember what Easter really means tomorrow.

Saturday Matinee – Tool, Elvin Bishop & Lonnie Brooks

Saturday, 8 April 2017

Very odd video. I like it.

Elvin Bishop goes fishin’. Guy has an amazing history, and I’m surprised he isn’t a full-fledged Rock God by now. His website www.elvinbishopmusic.com is back up and running.

We lost another great bluesman recently:
Lee Baker, Jr., aka Lonnie Brooks (1933-2017).

Lonnie Brooks was another classic bluesman with an interesting background.

Have a great weekend, folks. We’ll be back here tomorrow, whether you like it or not.

Saturday Matinee – Billy Blob, Superstitions & Stevie Wonder

Saturday, 1 April 2017

Clever animation from Billy Blob: Two radiation particles travel to Earth with a mission and a cool soundtrack.

Origins of some common superstitions [via]. They missed the obvious. Walking under a ladder is dangerous because you might dislodge it, or whoever’s working up top might accidentally drop something on you. I’d guess that the business about stepping on a crack likely has to do with walking on thin ice. Seven years of bad luck for breaking a mirror? Not so sure about that one.

Stevie Wonder, live at Sesame Street, 12 April 1973. What a killer groove. I liked this one even better:

Yeah. That. Head-bobbin’ trad-blues-funk at it’s best.

Have a great weekend, folks, and we’ve got more cool stuff coming soon.

Saturday Matinee – Chuck Barris & Eugene Patton, Count Basie & America Paz

Saturday, 25 March 2017

Yeah, we lost another famous Chuck this week. Here’s Chuck Barris on The Gong Show featuring the late Eugene Patton, aka, Gene Gene The Dancing Machine. (If you thought I was going to post vids of The Unknown Comic, you’re mistaken, but here’s a link instead.)

GGTDM’s themesong was always Count Basie‘s 1938 hit “Jumpin’ At The Woodside,” so let’s go there. Here’s Basie’s Orchestra playing their 1937 hit “One O’Clock Jump” six years later in the movie Reveille with Beverly.

That 1943 Basie lineup likely included Buck Clayton, Harry “Sweets” Edison, Snooky Young, trumpet; Dicky Wells, trombone; Earle Warren, Buddy Tate, Don Byas, Jack Washington, saxes; Freddie Green, guitar; Jo Jones, drums. Not sure who’s on bass.

This Funk Bass Slapfest is awesome, and the girl’s smacking a six-string. I’m guessing that this how Julliard students settle their differences and go busking at the same time.

OH WAIT! THAT’S AMERICA PAZ!

Very impressive, Ms. America.

Have a great weekend, folks. We’ll see you tomorrow.

R.I.P. Chuck Berry (1926 – 2017)

Sunday, 19 March 2017

Wow. What a legend. No reason for me to do a write up for someone so well known for so long, but I’ll admit this: I didn’t care for his music that much when I was young. Although I appreciated his talent and his importance in the early days of R&B / R&R, the songs sounded the same to me.

In 1972 someone gave me a copy of “The London Chuck Berry Sessions.” It impressed the hell out of me, and I became a true convert. I played that album so many times that light showed through the grooves.

Like an old song said, “If there’s a Rock and Roll heaven, it’s gotta have a helluva band. Hail, hail, indeed.

Saturday Matinee – The Pogues, Ron Kavana & Rex McGhee

Saturday, 18 March 2017

Every true Irishman knows that Saint Patrick’s Day doesn’t start at midnight. It begins at sunrise and ends at sunrise if you’re doing it right. My ancestry is Scots-Irish, which means I can drink without having to wear a kilt to play golf, and I don’t have to go to Confession afterwards.

One of The Pogues‘ classics.

Here’s another Pogues’ classic song, “Young Ned Of The Hill,” as performed by the original songwriter Ron Kavana (who didn’t write it).

This my favorite Irish Rebel Song:

Nell Flaherty’s Drake is a nice tune, but the original Broadside was pure sarcasm.

Have a great weekend, folks, and if we’re not back up on Sunday it’s due to an ongoing malware battle with a faux svchost.exe daemon.

 


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