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Archive for the ‘Contributions to the World’ Category

Huang Yung-fu’s Contribution To The World: Painted Village, Taiwan

Monday, 3 December 2018

What started as a hobby became something with more of a purpose. Local families were protesting the scheduled demolition of an abandoned 1940s military encampment just on the outskirts of Taichung. Huang Yung-fu, who is now known as ‘Grandpa Rainbow’ is a veteran with no previous professional trainings. He just picked up a paintbrush about 4 years ago and the whole neighborhood is his huge and borderless canvas to paint.

[Images and caption found here via here.]

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A Da Vinci Bridge – 15th Century Engineering

Tuesday, 23 October 2018

Okay 1502 AD is technically the 16th Century, but the engineering was already in existence.

VERY cool – You can build it on the spot if there’s available timber, no connectors required, and you can knock it down and take it with you once your army has crossed the stream, arroyo, ravine or ditch. Here’s one in use (with planks installed):

This kid constructed one without notches or connectors, using friction and compression only.

[Top image from Da Vinci. 2nd image from here, video from here, links found in here.]

Ruth Norman’s Contribution To The World: Intergalactic Psychic Communications

Wednesday, 1 August 2018

Ruth Norman (1900-1993) was the gilded leader of “Unarius,” a UFO cult founded with her husband Ernest in 1954. Ruth was not only a figurehead for “interdimensional understanding” but a master at putting together looks fit for an intergalactic space queen.

[Photos & modified caption found here and, yes, there’s more.]

Huang Shiguo’s Contribution To The World: Making Paper The Hard Way

Monday, 2 July 2018

“A 65-year-old resident of a Chinese village named Huang Shiguo has been making paper according to old traditional technology for the last 36 years. According to him, for a month he produces about 3,000 sheets of such paper, earning about 9,000 yuan or 1,400 dollars.
[Huang] argues that paper made in a traditional way is much more durable, quality and soft compared to the manufactured methods. The master sells its products in the local markets of China.”

At time of posting, 9,000 yuan is equivalent to US $1,355, so each sheet of handmade paper earns him about 45 cents. Not bad, given the cost of living in rural China, but he’s not living in rural China. He’s demonstrating and preserving ancient technology, and selling his expensive product while living in a tourist mecca. Pure undiluted capitalism. Kudos.

“Huang Shiguo, 65, makes paper using ancient methods in his home in Baishui Village, Qiandongnan Miao and Dong Autonomous Prefecture, Southwest China’s Guizhou Province. Huang said he began learning the traditional paper-making craft at 29 and has been dedicated to the ancient craft ever since. Locals in the area have a more than 1,000-year history of paper making as the region is rich in Yangshan Bamboo, a main material needed for the craft. Huang said the typical process involves 72 steps and 55 days to produce paper.”

[Photos and 1st caption (translated from Russian via Google Translate) found here. 2nd caption from here.]

6 June 1944 D-Day

Wednesday, 6 June 2018

In 1944, and against the odds, General Dwight D. Eisenhower accepted the risk and subsequent bloodshed in order to prevent more of it. His leadership freed France from Nazi Germany occupation and was the beginning of the end of the war in Europe.

General Eisenhower was mocked by the left as a dullard, stupid and ignorant. He wasn’t. Not by a long shot.

[Found in here.]

Fallen Astronaut Memorial

Monday, 2 April 2018

Fallen Astronaut is an aluminum sculpture of an astronaut in a spacesuit which commemorates astronauts who died in the advancement of space exploration. It is currently at Hadley Rille on the Moon, having been placed there by the crew of Apollo 15.


It’s the only art installation on the moon. Fourteen names are listed on the memorial plaque, but three are missing. The deaths of two cosmonauts were unknown to the western world, and one astronaut was accidentally overlooked.

[Found here.]

M. Alexis Dolinoff’s Contribution To The World

Thursday, 1 March 2018

[Image found here. Related posts here.]

Charles Brace Darrow’s Contribution To The World: Monopoly

Tuesday, 26 December 2017

Darrow’s “Monopoly” made him a millionaire, but it wasn’t completely original. It was an adaptation of “The Landlord’s Game” patented over three decades earlier by Elizabeth J. Magie:

 

Elizabeth Phllips (nee Magie) renewed her patent in 1924.

[Found here.]

Saturday Matinee – Tennessee Whiskey, The Spunyboys & Fats Domino

Saturday, 28 October 2017

Dad sings Chris Stapleton‘s R&B version of David Allen Coe‘s take on Linda Hargrove‘s “Tennessee Whiskey” in a parking lot. Awesome. Yeah, it went viral some time ago, but it’s still a good-un.

The Spunyboys rock.

R.I.P. Antoine Dominique “Fats” Domino Jr. [1928-2017]. He was the greatest Country/Blues/R&B/Rock and Roll crossover recording artist ever, and he influenced generations with his easily recognized voice and rolling piano style.

Have a greats weekend, folks. Be back here tomorrow for stuff.

Saturday Matinee – Kirsten Lepore, Sid Laverents, Unknown Boogie Master & Commander Cody

Saturday, 14 October 2017

Kirsten Lepore‘s animated short “Bottle” won awards.

Sid Laverents played the classic song “Nola,” written in 1915 by pianist Felix Arndt (author of many player piano rolls). Laverents 1970 short film film Multiple SIDosis is one of the few amateur films to have been selected for inclusion in the National Film Registry [h/t wheels].

BTW, Newark Athelete (1891) is the oldest film in the NFR and runs about 10 seconds.

Workman on lunch break plays boogie woogie at the Public Piano in St Pancras Station, London. Some think he was just a plant in a public works suit, but so what. It’s all entertainment.

Commander Cody‘s vintage 1977 cover of Bradley & McKinley’s 1940 classic “Beat Me Daddy, Eight to the Bar.” Nicolette Larson was one of the backup singers.

Have a great weekend, folks. We’ll do you proud. Or not.


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