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Archive for the ‘Contributions to the World’ Category

John Logie Baird’s Contribution To The World: The 1926 Televisor

Wednesday, 10 May 2017

The eerie image … shows the first image to ever be transmitted onto television. The year was 1926, and Scottish inventor John Logie Baird had successfully broadcast his business partner’s face through an apparatus he dubbed “the televisor”, which was of course the early version of all television sets today.

I’m guessing that’s a still from a 16mm test film, or perhaps it wasn’t animated at all and it was just a flickering image transmitted to a small (3.5″ x 2″) video display.

Another source includes this commentary:

One staff member quoted [the Editor of the London Daily Press] as saying: “For God’s sake, go down to the reception and get rid of a lunatic who’s down there. He says he’s got a machine for seeing by wireless. Watch him – he may have a razor on him.”

Following his demonstration in 1926, Baird developed colour TV and brought out the world’s first mass produced television set in 1929.

[Top image and caption found here; 2nd image and cap here.]

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Saturday Matinee – Hornet Nest Eradication Fail, Tom Sitter, Kenneth White, The Avett Brothers & The Magnetic Fields

Saturday, 29 April 2017

A Peavey amp, a Gibson, Black Sabbath, a Roman Candle, a hose and a folding yard stick is no defense from hornets. The part where he says, “Hold my beer,” is missing from the video.

From Laughing Squid:

Redditor Kathy Sitter very proudly posted a video of her 93-year old grandfather Tom Sitter telling an absolutely hilarious story to a very responsive audience during The Moth in Madison StorySLAM at the High Noon Saloon in Wisconsin. The theme of the night was “Love Hurts”, so Sitter spoke about his valentines from 1933, earning him a first-ever perfect score.

Kenneth White spent over 5 years building a replica wild west village from the 1880’s right in his backyard. White built everything from scratch including a saloon, a church with beautiful stained glass windows and an old-fashioned western jail complete with a prisoner in the bed.

What a great project. [Found here.]

How ’bout some modern country?

The Avett Brothers got the licks, and they proved it at Knoxville’s Tennessee Theater in 2015.

Bunkessa ran off to see The Magnetic Fields last night. The music isn’t quite my can of beer, but the animation is fun.

Have a great weekend, folks. See you back here tomorrow.

 

Yoneji Inamura’s Contribution To The World: 20,000 Beetles

Wednesday, 5 April 2017

Although [Yoneji] Inamura created several sculptures out of beetles, he spent 6 years in the 1970s constructing this one, which has become his masterpiece and the largest sculpture he ever made. When it was done he donated it to the city.

The sculpture, made from rhinoceros beetles, winged jewel beetles, drone beetles, longhorn beetles and other types of local beetles, depicts the senju kannon bosatsu (1000-armed bodhisattva), a popular Buddhist deity in Japan.

[Click on the smaller images to enlarge. More here, found here. Somewhat related posts here.]

Johann Friedrich Fleischer’s Contribution to the World: Lunar Humidity Distiller

Tuesday, 28 March 2017

lunar-humidity

“I will tell you this much however, that the rays of the Sun and Moon and Dew must be collected in a clean Jar or Vessel, separated from Rain and dirt, stench, smoke, and also from flying and wandering animals. The ways of attraction are many, but it is as well at home, as in an open place in the wind. As also a most fit and convenient Receptacle.”

Alchemist Johann Friedrich Fleischer‘s invention is described in his paper Chemical Moonshine, published in 1739. A subsequent publication in 1797 included the illustration above, by Sigismund Bacstrom, for its frontispiece

[Image found here.]

R.I.P. Chuck Berry (1926 – 2017)

Sunday, 19 March 2017

Wow. What a legend. No reason for me to do a write up for someone so well known for so long, but I’ll admit this: I didn’t care for his music that much when I was young. Although I appreciated his talent and his importance in the early days of R&B / R&R, the songs sounded the same to me.

In 1972 someone gave me a copy of “The London Chuck Berry Sessions.” It impressed the hell out of me, and I became a true convert. I played that album so many times that light showed through the grooves.

Like an old song said, “If there’s a Rock and Roll heaven, it’s gotta have a helluva band. Hail, hail, indeed.

Chew Mail Pouch

Tuesday, 3 January 2017

“If you can find a job that you would do without being paid, that’s what you should do.” – Harley Warrick

mail-pouch-silo-ohio

Large abandoned structure in Dillonvale, Ohio, in Jefferson county. Mail Pouch Tobacco ad barely visible.

[Found here.]

harley-warrick-mail-pouch-1

That’s Mail Pouch barn painter Harley Warrick (1924-2000).

Here’s an excellent tribute site to those who travelled the sticks to hand-paint the ubiquitous advertisements:

Mail Pouch Barnstormers.

That quote on top? It’s similar to what my own grampa told me:
“Find something you like to do, figure out how to get paid for it, and you’ll never work a day.”

“Chased him down the street in me undies and he got too far, so I went back and got my car…and then I chased him down the street in my little purple car.” – Dan McConnell

Wednesday, 30 November 2016

juke-boxer-hero

Unlicensed Brisbane driver fled the scene after crashing into a fish and chips shop and was chased down by a father of four wearing only his chonies.

Exclusive interview here:

Here’s an Exclusive Interview:

Exclusive Interview with Daniel McConnell:

For Exclusive Interviews with Dan McConnell, CLICK HERE.

[h/t The Feral Irishman.]

Saturday Matinee – Gary Lewis & The Playboys, Joe Cocker & Tom Jones, George Benson, and…

Saturday, 19 November 2016

Gary Lewis & The Playboys‘ “She’s Just My Style” reached #3 on The Billboard Hot 100 in January 1966. The chicks dug it.

Joe Cocker‘s take on “Delta Lady” earned him a hit in 1969, and in 1970 he doubled down by performing it with Tom Jones. The chicks dug it.

George Benson‘s recording of “This Masquerade” was a soft jazz R&B hit in 1976, reaching No. 10 on the Billboard Hot 100 and No. 3 on the Hot Soul Singles charts [Wiki]. The chicks dug it.

What do those songs have in common? They were all written by this guy:

Yeah, another great rock/soul/jazz/country icon passed away this week. R.I.P. Leon Russell (1942-2016).

Have no worries, these things happen all the time, and nobody lasts forever. Let’s have fun while we can. See you back here tomorrow.

WTFunction?

Tuesday, 25 October 2016

function-rubber-duck

[Found here via here, and TIMB has been officially notified.]

Daniil Sihastrul’s Contribution To The World

Wednesday, 24 August 2016

Daniil Sihastrul House of Rock 3Daniil Sihastrul House of Rock 1Daniil Sihastrul House of Rock 2

From Wiki:

Daniil Sihastrul (Romanian for “Daniel the Hesychast“) was a renowned Romanian Orthodox spiritual guide, advisor of Stephen the Great, and hegumen of Voroneț Monastery. Canonized by the Romanian Orthodox Church in 1992.
[…]
Daniil Sihastrul ignited a hermit movement in northern Moldova, having many novices in the woods surrounding Voroneț, as well as at the hermitages and monasteries in its surroundings. He encouraged Stephen the Great to fight for the defense of Christendom and to build holy places.

He has been considered a saint ever since his life time, being credited with healing the sick, exorcising demons, and removing suffering.

On first glance, it appears that St. Daniil was an eccentric loner who spent his life exorcising his mind from all thought in pursuit of purity of spirit for personal enlightenment, as that was apparently the aim of the Hesychasts. On the other hand, he was not a hermit full time, and used his stone temple as a place of refuge and contemplation. Given that he advised military strategist Stephen The Great, Daniil was well respected at the time (late 1400s AD).

Now what did Stephen The Great do? He stopped the Ottoman Empire warlords from overrunning Moldova, killing Christians and others indiscriminately, and from instituting islam and shari’ia law.

St. Stephen defeated Mehmet at a famous and decisive battle in a place called Vaslui (not far south of Iaṣi in the province of Moldova). Had he not done so, little would have stood between Mehmet and the Ukraine—and the obliteration of the rest of the Orthodox world. Mehmet met his match shortly after having sacked Constantinople. With the rest of the Balkan peninsula falling to Islam’s sword, Mehmet must have seemed unstoppable to Christians everywhere, yet none of the Western powers nor the Western Church would lift a finger against the Ottomans. Thus, Stephen stood more or less alone in defense of Christianity and his homeland [via].

Interesting times, indeed.

Oh, and here’s a photo of Deniis hawking his CDs. I’m not an historian, but it amazes me what one may find just by searching for the origin of an image.

[Images found here and via here.]


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