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Archive for the ‘History’ Category

13,000 Years BC Hot Links

Sunday, 4 August 2019

Lavalampage.

Chonis Donees! [via]

Irish Barrel Dancing.

When a post hits your eye
Like a big pizza pie,
That’s a Moire.

Bear necessities [h/t bekitschig].

Twilight Zone Radio Show Episode 61.

Gillette lost billions after a bigoted ad campaign.

It’s only 4th Grade Science. (Brilliant captions, too.)

Hans Prinzhorn’s Artistry of the Mentally Ill (1922).

“We spoke with many people today who say that the President should consider coming here to Baltimore … to see for himself.” [via]


READ CHAPTER X and explain to me how the U.S. Democrat Party (and Bernie Sanders’) platform differs from that of mass murderer Josef Stalin. Describe the results.


[Top image from here: “One unlucky day 13,000 years ago, a slight, malnourished teenager missed her footing and tumbled to the bottom of a 100-foot pit deep inside a cave in Mexico’s Yucatán. Rising seas flooded the cave and cut it off from the outside world—until a team of divers chanced upon her nearly complete skeleton in 2007.”]

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Henri Lanos 1888 – Les Travaux de la Tour Eiffel – La Grande Echelle

Monday, 8 July 2019

Henri Lanos (1859-1929) was a French illustrator and painter whose work appeared in French magazines like La Caricature, L’Illustration and Je Sais Tout. He was member of the Société des Artistes Français (French Artists Society).

3-point perspective (1 point + zenith + right) is awesome. He even detailed rivets, and showed Paris’ 1855 Palais de l’Industrie in the distance.

[Found here, via here.]

Well-Heeled Hot Links

Sunday, 7 July 2019

Coral.

$15.2K?

Ink spiders.

“Who did it better?”

That’s not an Obama flag.

L.A. Earthquake vs. L.A. Rain.

A Humble Request [Updated].

A story about an S-Ho found here. [Language]

How To Solve The Homeless Problem Dept:
Force them to listen to this every day, like we have to.

President Thomas Jefferson, at 64 and in declining health, was NOT the likely father of any of Sally Heming‘s children. More here.

Betsy Ross’ flag was never the official flag of the United States of America. The USA did not exist until she won her independence in 1783.


From the Archives: 1 year ago5 years ago. 10 years ago.


[Top image: Shame on Nike.]

Independence Day 2019

Thursday, 4 July 2019

On 9 November 1781, British General Cornwallis formally surrendered 8,000 British soldiers and seamen to a French and American force at Yorktown, Virginia, bringing the American Revolution to a close.

The United States Constitution was ratified eight years later in 1789, and a New Nation was born, conceived in Liberty. The US Constitution is the world’s oldest written constitution still in effect.

The flag in the painting is the 1st adopted flag of the United States of America as approved by the Continental Congress of 1777. It postdates the ones sewn by Betsy Ross and others, and predates the defeat of the British.

The irony that’s not taught in schools is that the Founding Fathers were British and The American Revolution was fought by the British against the British. TRUE.


That’s the first known recording of John Philip Sousas “The Stars And Stripes Forever March.” It was recorded by Kendle’s First Regiment Band on 29 December 1901 and published by Victor Records [source]. Sousa wrote in his autobiography that he composed the march on Christmas Day, 1896, while crossing the Atlantic, after he learned of the death of his band’s manager.

In 1987, an Act of Congress declared the song to be the Official National March of the United States of America.


[Top image from here. More Independence Day posts here. Don’t miss this.]


P.S. For the under-educated Kaepernick types who believe that this Great Nation was founded upon slavery:

Name one other nation in history (at the formation of This  Great Nation) that did not practice and condone slavery.

Name one other nation in history that blockaded slave ships within 18 years of its founding.

Name one other nation in history that made slavery illegal within 75 years of its founding.

Don’t bother. You can’t.


Conch Conch On The Head Hot Links

Sunday, 23 June 2019


Murder In The Red Barn [1827].
Murder In The Red Barn [78 rpm melodrama 1932].
Murder In The Red Barn [Tom Waits & Kathleen Brennan 1992].


Butting heads.

Whoa. Just whoa.

Salmon Crossing [via].

Bonk Bonk On The Head.

Autos Cubanos en el año 2019 [via].

Who’ll Stop The Rain? This guy can [via].

Visit Los Angeles! See Socialism In Action!

Possibly the worst job in the tech industry.

No racism to see here. Nope. None whatsoever.

Ideology doesn’t change. People do.” – Burgess Owens


From the Connections Department: Bandleader Fred Waring begat The Waring Blender which begat Dr. Jonas Salk’s polio vaccine. TRUE.


From The Archives: 1 year ago. 5 years ago. 10 years ago.

[Top image: Conchface from here via here via here.]

On Lynching.

Thursday, 20 June 2019

The CHAMBER OF HORRORS at the Southwestern Historical Wax Museum in State Fair Park of Dallas, Texas, recreates an event that took place in Ada, Oklahoma, April 19, 1909, when a lynch mob took four suspected murderers from jail to a barn where they administered frontier type justice.

According to the Tuskegee Institute, 4,743 people were lynched between 1882 and 1968 in the United States, including 3,446 African Americans and 1,297 whites. More than 73 percent of lynchings in the post-Civil War period occurred in the [Democrat-controlled] Southern states. [Wiki]

[Image and caption found here.]

The Battle of Midway – 4-7 June 1942

Wednesday, 5 June 2019

77 years ago, The Battle of Midway dramatically changed the outcome of WWII in the Pacific.

An out-gunned flotilla of US warships took advantage of information provided by Joe Rochefort‘s codebreakers and caught Imperial Japan’s massive attack force off guard. It was perhaps the most decisive battle in naval history.

By mid-1942, Rochefort’s codebreakers could read much of the Japanese Purple Code (Rochefort was fluent in the language) and they knew that an attack was imminent on “AF” but they didn’t know where AF was. They arranged that an un-encrypted message be sent from Midway Island claiming that the desalinization plant was down and the island was almost out of fresh water (it wasn’t).

Japanese intelligence intercepted the alert and sent coded messages that “AF” was out of water, and the codebreakers confirmed that “AF” was Midway. Rochefort’s team also predicted the direction that Admiral Admiral Yamamoto’s armada would attack from.

It wasn’t an easy fight. The U.S. Navy lost the USS Yorktown, the destroyer USS Hammann (DD-412), and nearly 150 aircraft. More than 300 Sailors were killed or injured. But when you stack it up against Japanese losses (four carriers, a heavy cruiser, more than 300 planes, and some 2,500 casualties) there’s little room for doubt as to who won.

Admiral Yamamoto’s armada was successfully ambushed while attempting to ambush the US Navy.

[Image and quote from here. More at the links above.]

P.S. If you think Hollywood’s version of Midway is accurate, it’s not.

Memorial Day

Monday, 27 May 2019

Please take a moment to honor all who gave their lives on our behalf.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Amen.

 

The All-In-One Radio Of The Future ca.1935

Tuesday, 14 May 2019

This telephone, radio, video, news link, photo transmitter/receiver, printer included a “Like” function to transmit audio applause. It was an all-in-one Victrola on steroids, a paleo Smart Phone that went up to 11.

[Images found here and here. More here.]

Robert H. Keaton’s Contribution To The World: The Music Typing Machine

Monday, 6 May 2019

It’s an interesting arrangement that gives the Keaton Music Typewriter its distinctive look. In terms of engineering, thanks to a curved meter on the left that Keaton called the Scale Shift Handle and Scale Shift Indicator, it’s easy to control exactly where the notes and characters fall on the page. By moving the handle up or down a notch, the typewriter adjusts to print 1/24 inch in either direction. Moving one notch up or down will cause the character to fall one musical step either way.

It appears that the typed sheet music in the museum display (the 2nd image) is turned 90 degrees from the way the machine types, or perhaps it’s a different model.

[Images and text found here; Original Patent here; Video here.]


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