Archive for the ‘History’ Category

Head (bread, kneaded)

Tuesday, 14 January 2020

[From Hans Prinzhorn’s Artistry of the Mentally Ill (1922).]

The Dorque of WTF

Thursday, 9 January 2020

Arthur William Patrick Albert, aka Prince Arthur, Duke of Connaught and Strathearn, son of Queen Victoria and Prince Albert, circa 1874.
That photo wasn’t good enough for him, so he upped the ante.

Yeah. That rocks. Much better.

[Found here.]

Epstein Didn’t Kill Himself Hot Links

Sunday, 15 December 2019

The Ass of the Sphinx.

Archie McFee’s Rubber Chicken Choir. Related link here.

We Build The Wall is under attack by faux environmentalists.
[UPDATE: Commenter Stan noticed that the site’s link doesn’t link properly to the story. Here it is.]

Titania McGrath: One of the best satirical accounts that hasn’t been permanently banned from Twitter: “Heterosexuality was invented by patriarchs as a means to justify their subjugation of women.” 😀


From The Gabba Gabba Hey Dept:

End Of The Century official trailer.

The Curse of The Ramones. Mikal Gilmore lifted most of his material from the 2003 documentary for his 2016 article published in Rolling Stone.

Justice for Damone Ramone.


Read Article I Section 2 Clause 5 of the U.S. Constitution.

The House of Representatives shall chuse their Speaker and other Officers; and shall have the sole Power of Impeachment.

If you’re 18 or older, now is a good time to re-read The Bill Of Rights.

No time for that? Constitutional lawyer Mark Levin breaks it down in only 6 minutes.


From the Archives: 1 year ago. 5 years ago. 10 years ago.


[Top image: That’s one person’s approximation of the visual effect of a “visual migraine.” They are generally infrequent, usually benign, and last 20-30 minutes. Mine are similar, but look like a thin flashing jagged semicircle of neon white and sky blue shiny tinsel that starts small and gradually expands. No headaches, just temporary visual perception oddness.]

7 December 1941 – Pearl Harbor

Saturday, 7 December 2019

Always Remember: The declaration of war was issued AFTER the attack.


This film is interesting.


That’s my late dad’s stamp that he put on most correspondence.

Klaus-Günter Jacobi’s Contribution To The World

Wednesday, 4 December 2019

If socialism is such a great economic system, why have so many people died trying to escape it?

Risking imprisonment, torture and death, Klaus-Günter Jacobi modified a BMW Isetta to help his friend escape the oppression of East Germany in 1963. Nine others were able to escape using the same method.

[Escaping East Berlin in a 1961 BMW Isetta [via]. Short vid here.]

Thirsty.

Monday, 2 December 2019

At the Drinking Fountain, New York, USA, 1930s.

[Found here.]

Thanksgiving 1621

Thursday, 28 November 2019

“Our harvest being gotten in, our governor sent four men on fowling, that so we might after a special manner rejoice together, after we had gathered the fruits of our labors; they four in one day killed as much fowl, as with a little help beside, served the Company almost a week, at which time amongst other Recreations, we exercised our Arms, many of the Indians coming amongst us, and amongst the rest their greatest king Massasoit, with some ninety men, whom for three days we entertained and feasted, and they went out and killed five Deer, which they brought to the Plantation and bestowed on our Governor, and upon the Captain and others. And although it be not always so plentiful, as it was at this time with us, yet by the goodness of God, we are so far from want, that we often wish you partakers of our plenty.”

–Edward Winslow, December, 1621

 


Nearly all of what historians have learned about the first Thanksgiving comes from a single eyewitness report: a letter written in December 1621 by Edward Winslow, one of the 100 or so people who sailed from England aboard the Mayflower in 1620 and founded Plymouth Colony in Massachusetts.

[…]

Just over 50 colonists are believed to have attended, including 22 men, four married women—including Edward Winslow’s wife—and more than 25 children and teenagers. These were the lucky ones who had made it through a rough entry into the New World, including a harsh winter during which an epidemic of disease swept through the colony, felling nearly half the original group. Some 78 percent of the women who had arrived on the Mayflower had died during the first winter, a far higher percentage than for men or children.

“For the English, [the first Thanksgiving] was also celebrating the fact that they had survived their first year here in New England,” Tom Begley [of Plymoth Plantation] points out.

The Plymouth colonists were likely outnumbered more than two-to-one at the event by their Native American guests. Winslow’s account records “many of the Indians coming amongst us, and amongst the rest their greatest king Massasoit, with some ninety men.” Massasoit (who was actually named Ousemequin) was the sachem (leader) of the Pokanoket Wampanoag, a local Native American society that had begun dealings with the colonists earlier in 1621.


[Image from here, historical commentary from here.
Related posts here.]

In 1915, The U.S.S. North Carolina Became The 1st US Aircraft Carrier.

Monday, 25 November 2019

 

[The] catapult was installed on board the U.S.S. North Carolina during the late summer of 1915. The first test was made with a plane which carried no pilot, with the controls lashed in flying position. The experiment was successful so far as the catapult was concerned, although the plane stalled at the end of the track and spun into the water. This was sufficient proof for Lieutenant Commander Mustin, commandant of the station, and he ordered the second plane aboard to be prepared for a catapult shot. Climbing in and warming up the engine he flew the first plane off a catapult mounted on a ship. After several live shots, the next attempt was to catapult a plane while the ship was definitely under way. Lieutenant A. A. Cunningham, U.S. Marine Corps, was selected for this experiment. This shot, however, failed and the plane struck the water with one wing and turned over. Fortunately, the pilot swam out from under and was picked up by a boat.

[Found here.]

Inverted Hot Pot Hot Links

Sunday, 24 November 2019

THIS.

Donald and Lydia.

Reserved Parking.

Whatever it is, I’m against it.

The first Elvis impersonator was female?


Flash Basbo, Space Explorer.

Greta Thunberg, Time Traveler.

One college football game impacted “the survival of the human race.


Mark Levin‘s book “UNFREEDOM OF THE PRESS” is worth a read no matter which political aisle your assigned seat is on.

USNI’s PROCEEDINGS asked readers, “What is the most realistic submarine movie ever made?” The German version of Das Boot topped the list.


From the Archives: 1 year ago. 5 years ago. 10 years ago.


A Humble Request. Updated: More surgery scheduled.


[Top image found here. For bonus points, name the city in the reflection.]

Armistice Day: The 11th Hour of the 11th Day of the 11th Month, 1918

Monday, 11 November 2019

Veterans Day gives Americans the opportunity to celebrate the bravery and sacrifice of all U.S. veterans. However, many Americans confuse this holiday with Memorial Day.

A Brief History of Veterans Day

Veterans Day, formerly known as Armistice Day, was originally set as a U.S. legal holiday to honor the end of World War I, which officially took place on November 11, 1918. In legislation that was passed in 1938, November 11 was “dedicated to the cause of world peace and to be hereafter celebrated and known as ‘Armistice Day.'” As such, this new legal holiday honored World War I veterans.

In 1954, after having been through both World War II and the Korean War, the 83rd U.S. Congress — at the urging of the veterans service organizations — amended the Act of 1938 by striking out the word “Armistice” and inserting the word “Veterans.” With the approval of this legislation on June 1, 1954, Nov. 11 became a day to honor American veterans of all wars.

In 1968, the Uniform Holiday Act ensured three-day weekends for federal employees by celebrating four national holidays on Mondays: Washington’s Birthday, Memorial Day, Veterans Day, and Columbus Day. Under this bill, Veterans Day was moved to the fourth Monday of October. Many states did not agree with this decision and continued to celebrate the holiday on its original date. The first Veterans Day under the new law was observed with much confusion on Oct. 25, 1971.

Finally on September 20, 1975, President Gerald R. Ford signed a law which returned the annual observance of Veterans Day to its original date of Nov. 11, beginning in 1978. Since then, the Veterans Day holiday has been observed on Nov. 11.

[Source, more at the link. Related posts here.]


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