Posts Tagged ‘History’

Soviet Era KGB Telephones

Tuesday, 6 July 2021

At first I though it might be a gag/hoax/photoshop, then I found this:

[Top images found here.]

Independence Day

Sunday, 4 July 2021

The Star Spangled Banner, The Diamond Four (ca. 1898) Berliner 4258, 7-inch 70 rpm record found here. Under the Berliner Gramophone trademark, German inventor and audio recording pioneer Emile Berliner began marketing 7-inch diameter disc records in the United States in 1894. The Diamond Four recorded several other songs for Berliner.

Stars And Stripes Forever, Kendle’s First Regiment Band (1901)Possibly the first recording of John Philip Sousas “The Stars And Stripes Forever March.” Sousa wrote in his autobiography that he composed the march on Christmas Day, 1896, while crossing the Atlantic, after he learned of the death of his band’s manager. In 1987 an Act of Congress declared the song to be the Official National March of the United States of America.

Yankee Doodle Boy, Billy Murray (1906)The song was adapted and written ca. 1755 by Dr. Richard Shuckburgh(?); rewritten in 1776 by Edward Bangs(?); rewritten again in 1903 by George M. Cohen. [More history here and here.]

Also known as (I’m A) Yankee Doodle Dandy, the melody goes back to folk songs of Medieval Europe. The earliest words of Yankee Doodle came from a Middle Dutch harvest song of the same tune, possibly dating back as early as 15th-century Holland. It contained mostly nonsensical words in English and Dutch.

In 1978 Yankee Doodle was adopted as the Official Song of the State of Connecticut.

4 July 1918 WWI Hand-Painted Envelopes

[Independence Day Archive here.]

I’m sure it meant something.

Tuesday, 29 June 2021

From Lustige Blätter 1919.

Funny papers was the title of a German-language satire magazine. After a brief start-up phase in Hamburg, the magazine was published as a weekly newspaper from 1886 to 1944 in Berlin. It was founded and published by the writer Alexander Moszkowski.

[Image found here. Note that there is no Wikipedia entry for  Lustige Blätter in English.]

Ancient Masonry

Monday, 14 June 2021

[Detail & 2nd photo found in here. Satellite view from here. Related post here.]

6 June 1944

Sunday, 6 June 2021

Remember

The Past in the Present – George, Ben & Abe

Monday, 10 May 2021

According to the Reddit posts these images were created using FaceApp. Images found here, via here.

4 May 1970 Kent State

Tuesday, 4 May 2021

[Image & caption found here. May 4th archive here.]

Easter

Sunday, 4 April 2021

Fountains Abbey Cistercian Monastery
North Yorkshire, England
Established 1132AD.

Three Women in China

Wednesday, 10 March 2021

Three women in the pillory, China, Anonymous, c.1875

Earliest Tineye image search results link to various Chinese websites (deleted or defunct) ca. February 2008. One source claims these women were accused of witchcraft, which suggests that the picture may have been related to religious persecutions that occurred during the Taiping Rebellion and/or the later Boxer Rebellion.

Religious persecutions persist in modern day communist China, and they are brutal:

“Rooted in atheism and materialism, the communist regime has been brutally suppressing Uyghur Muslims, Christians, Buddhists, and Falun Gong practitioners for years. Those who refuse to comply with the CCP’s orders are detained and taken to secretive “re-education camps” where they are subjected to unimaginable abuses, including gang rape and electrocution.” [Source]

[Image found here.]

John L. Burns

Monday, 1 March 2021

“On the afternoon of July 1, 1863, as the tide of gray soldiers pushed forward towards town, a 69 year old defender confidently strode towards the expanding struggle. A veteran of the War of 1812, John Burns could not simply stand idly by as his home became a hotly contested battle ground. Moving in with the somewhat incredulous men of the Iron Brigade, the near 70 year old Burns fought along side men 50 years his junior. With them he would remain until wounded. Although the Southerners would capture the ground of the McPherson farm that he helped to defend, with assistance from his Union Army comrades, Burns found his way home where he recovered from several wounds received that day. A few months later, John Burns would have the honor of meeting and walking with President Abraham Lincoln when, in November of that year, Lincoln offered his few appropriate remarks to the dedication of the soldiers national cemetery.

Union Lieutenant Frank Haskell, also present for the battle, wrote of his brief contact with Burns. “I saw “John Burns,” the only citizen of Gettysburg who fought in the battle, and I asked him what troops he fought with. He said: “O, I pitched in with them Wisconsin fellers.” I asked what sort of men they were, and he answered: “They fit terribly. The Rebs couldn’t make anything of them fellers.”

And so the brave compliment the brave. This man was touched by three bullets from the enemy, but not seriously wounded.”


According to Burns’s biography in Appleton’s Cyclopedia, during the last two years of his life his mind failed, and his friends were unable to prevent his wandering about the country. He was found in New York City on a cold winter’s night in December 1871, in a state of destitution, and was cared for and sent home, but died of pneumonia in 1872.


[More about John L. Burns here. Colorized image found here, story here. Not sure why the farmhouse photo is distorted.]


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