Mayans. Gotta love ’em.

[Found in here; dated but related post here.]

Happy Labor Day

Labor Day Parade March Composer: H. C. Verner Published By S. Brainard’s Sons Co. Chicago, 1896.

CHORUS
Proud-ly we march– on “La-bor Day,”
With hearts so true, to guide the way;
Steps light and free, our ban-ner’s dis-played,
On “La-bor Day Par-ade.”

Click on images to enlarge & copy piano sheet music, or  download in .pdf format here.

Background story of the 1894 Pullman Riots and aftermath here. More Labor Day stuff here.

Saxicolous Hot Links

Bop Cat Stomp, King Charles & His Orchestra (1954)Except for discography and a few audio recordings on YouTube, I can find almost nothing about Charles Morris (aka King Charles, Blue Charlie Morris, Left Hand Charlie and Morris Charles). If anyone has a link to his background, please leave a comment and I’ll update this post.


Weather.

Pit Brow Lasses.

Pun for your life.

Iowan pick up lines.

Fischeinwickelpapier.

Bob’s Electric Theater.

Steve goes on a beer run.

X-Ray animation of beatboxing?!

The International House of Logorrhea is my go-to source for Hot Links titles.

Billy Ireland & the KKK. Good stuff (despite some unnecessary extraneous commentary). Nice collection of Ireland’s work here.

Misc. – Still trying to bitchslap the new WP format into something tolerable. It’s almost there,  I’m still messing with the unpredictable, and I’m not responsible for the overuse of white space. – Bunk

[Top image found here with the caption: “A female pit brow worker, the photograph was probably taken at the Wigan Coal and Iron Co Ltd.”]


From the Archives: 1 year ago. 5 years ago. 10 years ago.

Lawrence Lipton’s Contribution To The World – DUHAB the Beatnik Robot

July 19, 1965 – L.A. Times

GADGET FOR TODAY–Author Lawrence Lipton, chronicler of the beatnik scene, demonstrates his “robot,” Duhab (Detector of Undesirable HABitués). Lipton says robot ferrets out the undesirables – including censors, book-burners.
[…]
“The Venice West beat scene was the most promising attempt ever made to bring avant-garde culture to Southern California, and it was murdered by self-righteous, puritanical busy-bodies and hostile police,” he said.

[Image and story found here.]

IT’S OUR BLOGOVERSARY! 14 YEARS OF STUFF!

Tacky Raccoons Be Crawlin' 300

On Friday, 3 August 2007, the date of our first posted post that was posted, the world twitched imperceptibly, a global nanoflinch, an earthquake with the power of a morning fart, or less.

3 August 2007 – Whelped
3 August 2008 – 1st year Blogoversary
3 August 2021 – 14th year Blogoversary!

As of this date, there are exactly 5,466 posts in our archives, 9.4K comments and over 2.6M referral links that comprise

Steal, lift, purloin, burgle and abscond with anything you find here, just link back and give us credit for finding the stuff before you did.

We’ve featured the Top 11 Posts every year since 3 August 2008 and this year is no different.

—Last Year’s Top 11 Hits linked here—

The numbers adjacent to the titles indicate ranking for the previous 12 months, followed by the previous year’s ranking, and the third number is for all-time popularity (August 2007 – August 2021).

“NR” denotes “Not Ranked.”

Click on any image below and it’ll take you to the original post. So let’s go!


No. 11/NR/393 – The .Gif Friday Post No. 627 – Ms. Iron Pants, Beer Bobbles & Diving Miss Ditzy


No. 10/NR/380 – Doktorskaya kolbasa


No. 9/NR/397 – R.I.P. Erdélyi Tamás, aka Tommy Ramone


No. 8/NR/44 – Kluck Klams – The Ghost of Walt Kelly Speaks


No. 7/11/411 – Open Your Mouth, Stick Out Your Tongue and Say, “Hot Links.”


mardi-gras-boobs-and-beads 150

No. 6/4/26 – Beads, Beer, Boobs & Blues = Heureux Mardi Gras!


No. 5/NR/267 – Swiss Fish Ladder


No. 4/NR/46 – Tweety Bird Dead at 67


No. 3/NR/NR – Pelicans Trying To Eat Other Animals


No. 2/1/35 – Bigass Ammonite Fossil is not a Bigass Ammonite Fossil


And the Number One Post for the past 12 months is:

I found a button hole.

Posted on 23 November 2020, this wins with a score of 1/NR/54. Another surprise dark horse entry, it made 1st Place in a mere eight months. Amazing.
All but three dropped off the list from last year.

Thanks for all your visits, comments, favorites and linkys, and I wish you all the best.

Bunk

P.S. Follow @bunkstrutts on Twitter for automatic updates with little to no commentary (aside from stuff I find interesting); ditto for you folks on Facebook. Both accounts are spam-free. Also, muchísimas grassyass to those of you who contributed to our PayPal Donation Account. We’re not in this for profit and we don’t beg, but that doesn’t rule out blogwhoring. In any case, we appreciate it, and a dime a day keeps the meerkats away. Cutesy little standy-uppy weasel-lookin’ bastards.

Independence Day

The Star Spangled Banner, The Diamond Four (ca. 1898) Berliner 4258, 7-inch 70 rpm record found here. Under the Berliner Gramophone trademark, German inventor and audio recording pioneer Emile Berliner began marketing 7-inch diameter disc records in the United States in 1894. The Diamond Four recorded several other songs for Berliner.

Stars And Stripes Forever, Kendle’s First Regiment Band (1901)Possibly the first recording of John Philip Sousas “The Stars And Stripes Forever March.” Sousa wrote in his autobiography that he composed the march on Christmas Day, 1896, while crossing the Atlantic, after he learned of the death of his band’s manager. In 1987 an Act of Congress declared the song to be the Official National March of the United States of America.

Yankee Doodle Boy, Billy Murray (1906)The song was adapted and written ca. 1755 by Dr. Richard Shuckburgh(?); rewritten in 1776 by Edward Bangs(?); rewritten again in 1903 by George M. Cohen. [More history here and here.]

Also known as (I’m A) Yankee Doodle Dandy, the melody goes back to folk songs of Medieval Europe. The earliest words of Yankee Doodle came from a Middle Dutch harvest song of the same tune, possibly dating back as early as 15th-century Holland. It contained mostly nonsensical words in English and Dutch.

In 1978 Yankee Doodle was adopted as the Official Song of the State of Connecticut.

4 July 1918 WWI Hand-Painted Envelopes

[Independence Day Archive here.]

I’m sure it meant something.

From Lustige Blätter 1919.

Funny papers was the title of a German-language satire magazine. After a brief start-up phase in Hamburg, the magazine was published as a weekly newspaper from 1886 to 1944 in Berlin. It was founded and published by the writer Alexander Moszkowski.

[Image found here. Note that there is no Wikipedia entry for  Lustige Blätter in English.]