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Posts Tagged ‘History’

The All-In-One Radio Of The Future ca.1935

Tuesday, 14 May 2019

This telephone, radio, video, news link, photo transmitter/receiver, printer included a “Like” function to transmit audio applause. It was an all-in-one Victrola on steroids, a paleo Smart Phone that went up to 11.

[Images found here and here. More here.]

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Mother’s Day Hot Links

Sunday, 12 May 2019

Arthur C. Clarke‘s predictions in 1974 (45 years ago). Wow.

What happens in the dishwasher stays in the dishwasher.

Fun Facts To Know And Tell 1:
President Reagan once gave a speech about manure.

Fun Facts To Know And Tell 2:
It all has to do with electrons. Mammals need iron for energy. Octopi need copper for the same reason and their is blood greenish-blue rather than red.

Fun Facts To Know And Tell 3:
WWII fighter pilot Jack C. Taylor (1922-2016) retired from the military in 1945 and started a successful car leasing business in 1948. He named it after one of the aircraft carriers he flew missions from – the USS Enterprise.

Octopus Hentai Fail. Girl got her cheek beak bit (and no, she wasn’t trying to eat it). [Update: Sources say she WAS trying to eat it.]

I didn’t like Never-Trumper Ben Shapiro before, and now I like him even less. What a snot.


Great Green Globs” as sung by Penn Gillette in 1994. It’s slightly different from what I remember:

Great big globs of greasy grimy gopher guts,
Dirty little birdy feet, mutilated monkey meat,
French fried eyeballs dipped in kerosene:
That’s what I had for lunch.

“All mixed up with all-purpose porpoise pus?” Nice addition. The differences are probably regional.


[Top image: “The Conversation” – William McGregor Paxton, 1940, found here.]

Robert H. Keaton’s Contribution To The World: The Music Typing Machine

Monday, 6 May 2019

It’s an interesting arrangement that gives the Keaton Music Typewriter its distinctive look. In terms of engineering, thanks to a curved meter on the left that Keaton called the Scale Shift Handle and Scale Shift Indicator, it’s easy to control exactly where the notes and characters fall on the page. By moving the handle up or down a notch, the typewriter adjusts to print 1/24 inch in either direction. Moving one notch up or down will cause the character to fall one musical step either way.

It appears that the typed sheet music in the museum display (the 2nd image) is turned 90 degrees from the way the machine types, or perhaps it’s a different model.

[Images and text found here; Original Patent here; Video here.]

Benjamin J.S. Cahill’s Contributions To The World

Tuesday, 30 April 2019

From the map inset:

“THE NEW STYLE WORLD MAP IS MADE BY CUTTING CROSSES AT 6 EQUIDISTANT POINTS ON THE COVERING OF A SPHERE WHICH IS THEN LAID OUT FLAT.

THE BUTTERFLY MAP

SHOWS THE WORLD JUST ABOUT AS ONE SEES IT ON A GLOBE WITHOUT EXAGGERATION OR DISTORTION OR ERRORS OF DISTANCE, AREA, OR DIRECTION. LONG DISTANCE FLIGHTS ALL OVER THE WORLD CAN BE ACCURATELY COMPARED ON THIS MAP AS ON NO OTHER.”


Bernard Joseph Stanislaus Cahill (1866–1944), cartographer and Architect, was the inventor of the octahedral “Butterfly Map” (published 1909; patented 1913).


At the start of his professional career in 1896, Cahill participated in the Phoebe Hearst competition for the design of the U. C. Berkeley campus. He was elected an Associate Member of the A.I.A. in 1899. He wrote articles for the “California Architect and Building News” and later for “The Architect and Engineer.” An early advocate of city planning, Cahill helped to define the concept of a “civic center” with his 1904 design of the San Francisco Civic Center, which he felt was the basis for the plan adopted by the city in 1912. He continued to be involved in the plan for the city, and wrote letters to the editor and articles expressing his ideas on the proper plan.

A specialist in mausoleum design and mortuary architecture, Cahill designed the catacombs and columbarium for the Cypress Lawn Cemetery, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows (San Francisco), Evergreen Memorial Cemetery Memorial Building (Oakland), the St. Mary’s Cemetery mausoleum (Sacramento), and the Diamond Head Memorial Park in Honolulu [more here].


[Map found here.]

The Blue Angels

Wednesday, 24 April 2019

About midway through the Cleveland Air Races in 1946 an event placed somewhat inconspicuously on the program was dutifully announced over the public address system. The man said that a Navy Flight Exhibition team in four Grumman Bearcat fighters would demonstrate Navy precision flying in formation. On the team were a Lieutenant Commander, a Lieutenant and two Lieutenants Junior Grade. They were all Naval Aviators with combat records.

[…]

Such a four-plane formation employed so skillfully in the last war [WWII] gave cause for its leader, out-numbered fifteen to one, to exclaim without hesitation,

“Red Leader to Carrier, I have 60 Zeros surrounded and am proceeding to attack!” All of his four planes got back and were accredited 17 “kills.”


This week in 1946 Chief of Naval Operations Admiral Chester W. Nimitz ordered the creation of a flight demonstration team. In 1949, the team took the name Blue Angels.

This 1950 Proceedings article explains the Blue Angels’ early history.

Ra The Cat

Wednesday, 20 March 2019

Okay, so like over a thousand years ago B.C. there was this Egyptian sun god named Ra, and he was pretty powerful. You’ve probably heard of him.

There was also a god named Apep or Apophis or something. He was a snake, the god of the underworld in charge of the forces of chaos and evil. The sun god had had enough of Apep‘s assholery and decided to take him out. Ra heard that Apep liked hanging out around a certain sacred sycamore tree.

Ra thought about it for a while, and instead of burning Apep to cinders with his sun god eyes, he decided to turn himself into a cat with a beard and a knife, find the sacred sycamore tree, and kill him. (He forgot that cats don’t have hands, but he ignored that part.)

Apparently Ra cut Apep pretty good, but he didn’t kill him, so he dropped the cat costume, went back to being the sun god and pretended it never happened. I think he was embarrassed.

Under a sacred sycamore the sun god Ra, in the form of a cat, slays the snake Apep (or Apophis), god of the underworld and symbol of the forces of chaos and evil. Detail of a wall painting from the tomb of Inherkhau (TT359).

New Kingdom, 20th Dynasty, ca. 1189-1077 BC. Deir el-Medina, West Thebes.

[Image & caption found here, via here.]

Water Towers

Wednesday, 6 March 2019

[Images found in here. Click for larger, each image has the name and location in the title of each .jpg.]

Occasional Cortex Hot Links

Sunday, 17 February 2019

Cat rescue.

Not alotta Lada left.

Veinte Ideas Increíbles Con WD-40.

“History never repeats itself, but it rhymes.”
-Mark Twain (or someone).

Dude is amusing. Death metal meets the Beatles.

Toyota key fob battery dead? Locked out? Can’t start your car? Try these hacks. Might work for other brands, too.

Fun Facts To Know & Tell: Every amoeba is a clone. If someone named Cathy owned one for a pet, it would be Cathy’s Clone.

Gary Sinese (aka “Lt. Dan” in the movie Forrest Gump) received a surprise tribute from service members, 1st responders & Hollywood celebs.

Universal Basic Income: Finland’s experiment (to reduce their 9% unemployment rate by handing out free money) lasted a little over one year. [h/t rightymouse]

What Americans Must Know About Socialism.

Venezuelan immigrants speak out: “You do not ever want anything close to socialism.”

[Top image: Alexandria Occasional Cortex & Friends. h/t Octo.]

National Gross Domestic Hot Links

Sunday, 16 December 2018

DJ Marshmallow is awesome [via].

Dontcha just know it. Cuba cuba cuba cuba

They named the student, but won’t name the badgering teacher.

Savannah College of Art and Design students opine on Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas when they’ve never heard of him.

Can’t score off the referee. Nope. (Was that one of the Hanson Brothers?)

Top 10 GDP By Country 1960-2017 is an interesting graph animation. Russia fell off the map in 1993 and didn’t make the Top 10 for 20 years. China made the list in 1993, and look what they’ve accomplished since then. [Found via here].

Baby It’s Cold Outside” is a pretty and innocent classic song about flirting, nothing more (despite what the SJWs would have you believe).

Fun Facts To Know And Tell: The USS California, christened in 1908, was sunk in 1918 by a German U-Boat.  The USS San Diego, christened in 1914, was sunk in 1918 by the same U-Boat… yet the United States lost only one ship during WWI. Amazing that only six lives were lost. The latest story (with photos and sonar imaging) is here.

“The difference between a good officer and a poor one is about ten seconds.” —US Admiral Arleigh Burke (1901-1996) More here.

A 3,000 year-old penguin “super colony” was recently discovered in Antarctica, and the UK Daily Mail has to explain what guano is.

Penguins migrate.

[Top image: One-Eyed Charley Parkhurst had a fascinating life story. More here.]

The .Gif Friday Post No. 562 – 7 December 1941 We Remember

Friday, 7 December 2018

The missus’ Uncle Harry was there. The Japanese were strafing the airfield, and Harry dived under the heaviest piece of equipment he could find.  He found out later that it was an ammo truck.

Harry survived the attack. Many did not.

That’s a scan of my late Dad’s rubber stamp. He used on all his snail-mail correspondence.

[Related posts here.]


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