Posts Tagged ‘.gif animation’

The .Gif Friday Post No. 449 – Valentin’s Wink, Walking on Sunshine & Erdal’s Kite

Friday, 26 August 2016

Lidia Valentin Wink

Catwalk 2

Kite Erdal Inci

[Found here, here and here. I flipped the 2nd one just because.]

The .Gif Friday Post No. 448 – Pangolin Yawns, Bull Fetches & StarWars Roly-Poly

Friday, 19 August 2016

Pangolin

Bulls Hit
StarWars Lo Poly

[Top one is for my friend @raincoaster, lifted and looped from here. 2nd one was mushed together from this and this; third found here.]

The .Gif Friday Post No. 447 – Now I gotta go pee.

Friday, 12 August 2016

pipedrip
invisible drinking fountain
firehydrant
waterwatcher

[All found in here. Warning: there’s some odd redirecting going on at that site.]

The .Gif Friday Post No. 446 – Fishing in Heels, 4AM at the Acid Mart & Trippy Flip

Friday, 5 August 2016

Fishing In Heels

Late Night At Krogers

FlipChange

[Found here, here and here.]

1.9 Million Views

Monday, 1 August 2016

1.9 VIEWS

Yeah, we’re crankin’ it.

The .Gif Friday Post No. 444 – SpockSpin, Running Late & Lapping Lizards

Friday, 22 July 2016

SpockSpin

Late For Work

Gecko Licks

[Found here, here and here.]

Bigass Ammonite Fossil is not a Bigass Ammonite Fossil

Monday, 18 July 2016

Ammonite

Yep, that looks like a bigass prehistoric ammonite fossil, and it’s not a snail fossil as the caption states.

Ammonites are perhaps the most widely known fossil, possessing the typically ribbed spiral-form shell as pictured above. These creatures lived in the seas between 240 – 65 million years ago, when they became extinct along with the dinosaurs. The name ‘ammonite’ (usually lower-case) originates from the Greek Ram-horned god called Ammon. Ammonites belong to a group of predators known as cephalopods, which includes their living relatives the octopus, squid, cuttlefish and nautilus [via].

I found the top image (with the erroneous caption) in here, and wondered about the story behind it. Since fossils are typically embedded in rock and I didn’t see any hole or excavation, something seemed off.

Ammonite Replica 2

Ammonite fossils are common, but are rarely larger than about 9 inches in diameter. Sure, some larger species have been found, but why wasn’t this one encased in plaster, crated up and shipped to an archeological museum? How could something so heavy and brittle stay in one piece while being tilted up? How could four guys lift it, let alone one?

A Tineye search brought me to the source –  a 2005 documentary filmed in Lyme Regis, England for the BBC series “Journey of Life.”

“This giant ammonite was actually a replica that we used to show how big ammonites could grow. Made of polystyrene it squeaked as we rolled it down the beach. The look of gob-smack on the faces of Jurassic Coast fossil collectors was priceless!”
Paul Williams, 3 September 2013.

This “fossil” was a prop, and it had a cameo role in Episode 1: Seas of Life.

[Full story with photos here.]

Perhaps you’re wondering why I suddenly found an interest in large fabricated ammonite fossils. It’s because I saw that top picture and wanted to do this with it:

Ammonite Beach Spin

The .Gif Friday Post No. 443 – Muy Alto Gato, Leapin’ ‘Lectricity & Bettin’ on the Bulls

Friday, 15 July 2016

Cactus Cat

Eel Leaping

Bullmoose Cool

[Found here, here and here.]

The .Gif Friday Post No.442 – Flip Fail, Emu Chase & Dog Spit

Friday, 8 July 2016

Flippy

Emu Dog Chase

Spitting Dogs

[Found here, here and here. Each one would be enhanced with a Wilhelm Scream.]

The .Gif Friday Post No. 441 – Sweded Pixar, Umbrella Strike & Capybara Rolling

Friday, 1 July 2016

PIXAR Sweded

Lightning Strike

Capybara Rolling

[Found here, here and here. Related sweded .gif in here.]


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