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Posts Tagged ‘Christopher Columbus’

IL Giorno di Cristoforo Columbo

Monday, 9 October 2017

The first commemorative stamps issued by the U.S. Postal Service honored Christopher Columbus on the 400th anniversary of his first voyage. $5 bucks in 1892 equates to about $130 in 2017 U.S. dollars, and not many could afford that steep price to ship something trivial.


The signature of Cristoforo Colombo [Italian], aka Cristóbal Colón [Spanish], aka Christophorus Columbus [Latin], aka Christopher Columbus [Anglic]. For the life of me I can’t decipher it, except that the “X” is likely the sign of Christ.

Apparently this mystery has stumped many, and it remains unsolved.


This one dollar Bahamian bill issued in 1974 features an image of Christopher Columbus and equals about $5 U.S. in 2017.


Columbus was a tyrannical leader by most accounts, but the fact that he made four round-trip voyages to The Americas tells us that he had men who were willing and able to take those dangerous risks on both sides of the Atlantic. (Note that Spanish law limited merchants to one slave per ship [source].)

As governor of Hispaniola and the Indies (1492-1499) he was a cruel despot and was removed and jailed by Queen Isabella I of Castile.

[Side note: Queen Isabella I presided over the final years of La Reconquista that began about 711AD. She didn’t put up with no jihad jibbajabba.]


Should we remove Christopher Columbus from history and kowtow to a relative handful of racist SJWs?

NO. His historical accomplishments far outweigh his failures, and he should be honored for his astounding bravery and seamanship in the face of the unknown, not his subsequent decline into dementia and moral turpitude. Any person, group or organization that attempts to rewrite history has nefarious motives in mind.

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Happy Columbo Day!

Monday, 10 October 2016

henricus_martellus_-_map_of_the_world_-_1489_-_yale_archive

The feat was both amazing and dangerous, especially given the limited technology of the time. The world was much larger than anyone had previously imagined, and relatively little had been recorded by seagoing cartographers. Much of what they compiled was inaccurate, but they were not completely in the dark.

They had the Martellus Map of 1489 [pictured above].

Cristoforo Colombo changed all that, and for that he should be remembered. He had big cojones, as did every sailor who joined him on his voyages into the unknown. I doubt that his financial supporters (including Queen Isabella of Spain) expected him to ever return from the first exploration, but he did, and he made several round-trip voyages after that, relying on seasonal trade winds.

Here’s to one of the greatest explorers in history.


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