Happy Thanksgiving

“The center of zeppelin production in the United States was Akron, Ohio. In 1916, the Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company purchased land near Akron to build a plant that could produce zeppelin aircraft. In 1917, the main Goodyear Company created a subsidiary known as the Goodyear Zeppelin Company to manufacture the zeppelins. That same year, the firm received a contract from the federal government to manufacture nine zeppelins for the United States military during World War I. Unfortunately for the company, its manufacturing facilities were not complete in 1917, so Goodyear completed the first airships inside of a large amusement park building in Chicago, Illinois. The military used these airships to bomb and to spy upon enemy positions.

At the conclusion of World War I, the Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company continued to manufacture zeppelins. The firm used most of these ships to advertise its products. By the late 1920s and the early 1930s, among the firm’s completed zeppelins were the Pony [1921-1923], Pilgrim [1925], Puritan, Volunteer, Mayflower, Vigilant, Defender, Reliance, Resolute, Enterprise, Ranger, and Columbia. [late 1920s – early 1930s].”

Those zeppelins were mostly used for shore patrol. The biggest hazard was that some yahoos liked to take pot shots at them, but they proved that the airships could sustain the damage and stay afloat. [Source]

[Original image source and date unknown; story found here.
More Thanksgiving stuffing here.]

Flying Bum Flies

 Flying Bum 2

Flying Bum 3

Flying Bum 1

A vessel said to be the world’s largest aircraft has left its hangar for the first time, in preparation for a test flight.

British company Hybrid Air Vehicles towed the Airlander 10 – nicknamed the Flying Bum – out of its hangar at the UK’s Cardington Airfield in the early hours of Saturday morning [via].

And Iowahawk wins at Twitter again:

Flying Bum 3a

M. Gaudron’s Contribution to The World: The 1910 Aerial Torpedo Boat

1901 Latest Flying Machine

“This machine is the invention of M. Gaudron, a Frenchman, who claims that in this perfected ‘aerial torpedo boat’ 100 feet long five passengers can be carried at a speed of 30 miles an hour.”

The article doesn’t mention where the passengers might be carried to at 30 mph, but after 114 years, who cares. [Found here.]

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