Archive for the ‘Retro’ Category

Saturday Matinee – Boston Dynamics, The Contours, RT n’ The 44s, Big Sandy and His Fly-Rite Boys & Roomful of Blues

Saturday, 2 January 2021

Our whole crew got together to celebrate the start of what we hope will be a happier year: Happy New Year from all of us at Boston Dynamics. http://www.BostonDynamics.com.

Over 18M views and 97K comments since 29 December, and you’ve probably seen it already. I wonder what The Contours think of it.

The Contours‘ chart-topping 1962 hit Do You Love Me became a major hit again in 1988. I bet it scores a third time.

RT n’ the 44s has a laid back retro vibe with a large dollop of Johnny Cash. They’ve been described as “a vintage country band with dark obsessions.”

Big Sandy & His Fly-Rite Boys have been jammin’ it since 1988, and here’s their cover of Colin JamesJumpin’ From Six to Six.

One of the best big brass blues bands in the land is Roomful of Blues. More than 50 musicians have played in the band since its inception in 1967, and I’m not sure of this 2013 lineup.

Have a great weekend, folks, because there’s more on the way. See you tomorrow.

New Year’s Eve 2020

Thursday, 31 December 2020

[Bottom image found here. Top .gif modified, found here.]

The Fuzzy Wonder Goat… & More!

Monday, 28 December 2020

The DeMoulin Bros. Co. supplied hazing equipment for fraternal organization initiations in the early 1900s. Some of the gaffes were truly bizarre.



Apparently the company is out of the fraternity prank business and has moved onto other products: scary marching band uniforms.

[Top image from here; tiled images from .pdf found here; more info here.]


Bonus: Here’s a restored “Fuzzy Wonder” (and a “Spanker”).

Saturday Matinee – Floorboarding, The Paul Whiteman Orchestra, The Jubalaires & A Burberry Ad

Saturday, 26 December 2020

Great animation followed by “the making of” [via].

Paul Whiteman was known as the King of Jazz, and no one as yet has come near carrying that title with more certainty and dignity. – Duke Ellington

Remastered footage from the 1930 movie King of Jazz (filmed entirely in two-color Technicolor) featured the Paul Whiteman Orchestra performing Happy Feet. Some amazing dance moves in that clip.

The Jubalaires – Orville Brooks, Ted Brooks, J.C. Ginyard & George McFadden – were a gospel group who recorded in the 40’s & 50’s. This version of Noah has a unnecessary modification towards the end, but it sorta works.

Singin’ in the Rain is one of the better ads I’ve seen, and I’m still not sure what they’re selling. [via].

I guess that’s eclectic enough for this edition. Have a great holiday weekend, see you tomorrow for the the post-Christmas sales.

Christmas of Joy

Wednesday, 23 December 2020

Click on any image to spread the Joy.
Images found here and elsewhere (via here).

Tortiloquacious Hot Links

Sunday, 20 December 2020

(I Want A) Rock and Roll Guitar, Johnny Preston (1960) Preston’s biggest hit was Running Bear and made No. 1 on the pop charts in 1959. The “Indian” sounds on the record were performed by J.P. “The Big Bopper” Richardson and George Jones.

Efficiency bed.

How’dy Hiram.

Dog be trollin’.

To the mountain.

The Christmas Pickle.

DO THIS RIGHT NOW.

Los rábanos seductores.

Misheard Christmas song lyrics.

Who was Shorpy Higginbotham?

Party Hard is the best Christmas song you’ll hear all week.

Theater In The Round nativity play is fun (interactive vid).

5 Minutes of a Pink Oyster Mushroom Playing a Synthesizer.

Use of Gamification Techniques to Encourage Garbage Recycling.

[Top image: Antique folk art animal carvings with original paint from here.]


From the Archives: 1 year ago. 5 years ago. 10 years ago.


Houston Aerial Transp’t Co. 1925

Tuesday, 8 December 2020

Maybe it’s Transparent or Transplant. I’m going with Transplat.
Oh wait…

[It was known as] C.C. Cannan Field since 1918 and as an informal flying field and race track before that. In 1925 the field was purchased by Vince Hays for his Houston Aerial Transport Company. It was on this field that Shorty Walker and Guy Hahn made and flew their airplanes and aircraft engines. [Source]

[Top image found here, 1923 C.C. Cannan Field article found here, 1923 Detroit Free Press ad here.]

Saturday Matinee – Gillian Hills, Delbert McClinton, The J. Geils Band & Bobby Womack

Saturday, 5 December 2020

“‘Tut Tut Tut Tut’ is indeed the Franco-phonetic way of imitating a busy signal. In the course of this two minute song, Hills huffs 7 TUTs in a row, four different times for a total of 28 TUTS. Then she adds another 15 or 20 during the fade. Who doesn’t love her TUTS?”

The song is featured in the 2020 TV miniseries “Queen’s Gambit” starring Anya Taylor-Joy, but Gillian Hills recorded “Tut Tut Tut Tut” in 1960, featured in the movie Beat Girl. An English version, Busy Signal was recorded by The Lollipops in 1965.

[Update – Corrected factual error. That is Gillian Hills in the video.]

“McClinton sounds EXACTLY like Peter Wolf!” – video comment

Delbert McClinton is the sound of Texas soul, and has the credentials, backing the likes of Sonny Boy Williamson II, Howlin’ Wolf, Lightnin’ Hopkins, and Jimmy Reed. Eventually he had a national hit, playing harmonica on Bruce Channel‘s “Hey! Baby” in 1962.

“Wolf sounds EXACTLY like Delbert McClinton!” – video comment

The J. Geils Band on The Old Grey Whistle Test 1973 (before all that garbage they put out in the 80s). They also covered this song:

Inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in 2009, Bobby Womack was slowing down by the time of this 2013 performance, and he passed away the following year at age 70. He first recorded “Lookin’ For A Love” with his brothers as The Valentinos.

Guess that’ll do it for now. Have a great weekend while you can, see you back here for dessert.

Hi, Bob!

Tuesday, 1 December 2020

Bobcat:
A medium-sized cat with long, tufted ears and a short, bobbed tail.
Lynx:
A medium-sized cat with long, tufted ears and a short, bobbed tail.

A bobcat is a lynx, but a lynx is not necessarily a bobcat.

[Image found here. Taxonomy clarifications found here.]

Thanksgiving Day Parade

Thursday, 26 November 2020

The early Thanksgiving Day parades often had a circus orientation, and hence the animal elements. Actual lions, tigers, and bears were trucked down city streets, traumatizing them and causing the elicitation of roars and growls that frightened observing children. Wisely, the use of living animals was abandoned after a few years, with animal balloons and floats substituted, together with some great vintage cartoonish stuff that was rather surreal.

[Image and text found here; previous Thanksgiving posts here.]


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