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Posts Tagged ‘Growing Dogs’

Growing Dogs: Part 4 – Over Watering

Monday, 13 November 2017

“Assuming you start with good stock, all it takes are a few clippings, good soil, and bone meal mulch to get ’em to take root and prosper,” said Ms. Crumbler, 78. “Then you have to keep them watered. They do better in the shade, otherwise they tend to wither, and you have to crop ’em back occasionally.”

Sage words indeed. On the other hand, some breeds adapt to over-watering better than others (such as Lily pictured above). Many breeds tolerate over-watering well, but excessive soaking may cause a wrinkled appearance accompanied with a pungent yeasty odor.

After a few days out of the water, most dogs revert to their natural state and the odors should dissipate from your carpet and furniture within a year or so.

[Top image found here, 2nd from here. Related posts here, here and here.]

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Downtown Dogpatch

Monday, 14 June 2010

No leash laws here.

[Found in here. Related posts here.]

Growing Dogs: Part 3 – Repotting

Tuesday, 17 February 2009

growing-dogs

[This is Part 3 of an ongoing series on Growing Dogs. Previous hints and tips may be found  here .]

Pisgah, OH (Strutts News Services) –

From Part 1 — Growing Dogs

Anyone who has tried to raise big dogs in the city understands the difficulties involved.  One authority, Ms. Tooncie Crumbler, has beat the odds and raised several healthy crops of Retrievers Golden outside her flat in downtown Pisgah.

We contacted Ms. Tooncie Crumbler, president of the Ohio Canine Planting Society, and asked her about the importance of planter sizing when raising pups.

“It all has to do with hybridization,” said Ms. Crumbler.  “Many hybrids require larger containers, lest they get rootbound.  If you pay attention to their growth patterns, these breeds will let you know when repotting is necessary for healthy growth.”

Ms. Crumbler said that the signs are usually obvious. “If the soil begins spilling from the top of the planter, that’s usually a good indication that the pup is ready for the next size up.  If you don’t replant within two to three weeks, your crop’s roots will be stunted, and that dog won’t hunt.”

[Coming up:  Part 4 – Pruning.]

[Image from here. ]


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