Posts Tagged ‘NASA’

Great Big Blobs

Monday, 16 November 2020

NASA scientists are studying planet magnetic fields and revisited raw data collected by Voyager 2 over three decades ago. They found that

Voyager 2 spotted a massive magnetic bubble pulling gas out of Uranus’ atmosphere.

https://www.space.com/uranus-gas-blob-voyager-2-discovery.html

Such loop-like plasmoids are typically formed as a spinning planet flings bits of its atmosphere to space. “Centrifugal forces take over, and the plasmoid pinches off.”

https://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov/news/details.php?article_id=119

Uranus pinches off big blobs and flings them.

NASA 1965

Thursday, 11 February 2016

Gemini SpacecraftAstronauts James McDivitt and Ed White inside the Gemini spacecraft for a simulated launch at Cape Canaveral, Florida, 1965

[Image and caption found here.] More about Ed White here.

Full Moon Heros

Sunday, 10 August 2014

APOLLO Astronauts Collins Lovell & Aldrin

Mike Collins, Jim Lovell & I [Buzz Aldrin] got a behind the scenes look at the Orion capsule being built at Kennedy Space Center. Like our bunny suits?

I shouldn’t have to tell you who these guys are or what they did, but all three have titanium cojones.

Lovell’s book “Lost Moon” is a can’t-put-down white-knuckle read, and was the basis for the excellent movie “Apollo 13.”

[Image and Aldrin’s caption found here.]

P.S. Tonight’s full moon is a “supermoon.”

NASA Launch

Wednesday, 25 September 2013

NASA Frog Launch

On 6 September 2013, NASA ignited a Minotaur V rocket that launched the LADEE spacecraft. (more…)

Hot ‘Lanta in May

Wednesday, 30 January 2013

Hot Lanta

On May 11-12, 1997, NASA used a specially outfitted Lear Jet to collect thermal data on metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia. Nicknamed “Hot-Lanta” by some of its residents, the city saw daytime air temperatures of only about 26.7 degrees Celsius (80 degrees Fahrenheit) on those days, but some of its surface temperatures soared to 47.8 degrees Celsius (118 degrees Fahrenheit). In this image, blue shows cool temperatures and red shows warm temperatures. Pockets of especially hot temperatures appear in white.

50 degrees Celsius = 120 degrees Fahrenheit = flat roof temperature. The red zone looks to be about 30C = 86F, but these are surface temperatures. The 1997 survey recorded air temperatures of 80 F – exactly the average high temp for May for Atlanta. Cool.

In other words, it’s a peachy image of normal surface temperatures for the city.

[Found here, which links to story here.]


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