Posts Tagged ‘Religion’

My Girl Is Red Hot Links

Sunday, 19 May 2019


Check out the 1st link here. (Thanks, Stacy.)


Ronnie Hawkins‘ girl is red hot, but your gal ain’t doodley squat. Just sayin’.


Can’t promote religion in public school except for this one.

“At least be forthright about your desire to subvert and dismantle our democracy into a creepy theological order led by a mad king.” -NY Rep. Alexandria Occasional Cortex


School lunch lady did the right thing and got fired for it.
[UPDATE: There’s more to the story.]

Lunch Lady action figure demonstration.


Woman gets suspended from FaceBook for posting easily verifiable facts.


From The Irony Department: Every Pro-Abortion advocate in history was not aborted. TRUE.


The Myths of the Minimum Wage. Yeah, I did my own research in 2014.

The Myths of Gasoline Pricing. Yeah I did my own research in 2009.


Need Bingo stuff? Here you go.


ZAP!


[Top Image:  Great Gift Idea from here, via here. More great gift ideas here.]

The Witch of Endor

Wednesday, 18 July 2018

Jacob Cornelisz van Oostsanen, 1526.

Okay, so here’s the short story as I understand it.

The Prophet Samuel was dead. Saul, King of Israel and Judah, was kinda nervous, and he needed a strategy to combat the assembled armies of the Philistines, but dreams, prophets (and parts of a breastplate worn by the High Priest to communicate with God) left him with no answers.

The Philistines wanted tribute, i.e, a protection payoff, and King Saul was tired of it.

Saul couldn’t think for himself, so he did what anyone in his position would do: search for a witch who could talk to the dead. Since necromancers had been thrown out of the Kingdom by Saul’s own decree, he put on a disguise and eventually found one in the remote village of Endor.

The witch contacted the soul of Samuel. Samuel was pissed at Saul for bothering him and gave him a load of crap. Then he stated that Saul’s army would be defeated the next day, and that the King would die. Saul freaked out.

Being a compassionate witch, she tried to calm him and insisted that he stay for supper. She fixed him a cheeseburger or something, and Saul left for home.

The next day King Saul’s army was defeated, and Saul committed suicide to fulfill the prophesy, circa 1012 BC.

At least that’s what I got from Wiki. BTW, apparently necromancers were also talented ventriloquists, and they didn’t work for free. Go figure.

No idea how the painting fits in to all of this, but there you go.

[Images found here and here.]

Daniil Sihastrul’s Contribution To The World

Wednesday, 24 August 2016

Daniil Sihastrul House of Rock 3Daniil Sihastrul House of Rock 1Daniil Sihastrul House of Rock 2

From Wiki:

Daniil Sihastrul (Romanian for “Daniel the Hesychast“) was a renowned Romanian Orthodox spiritual guide, advisor of Stephen the Great, and hegumen of Voroneț Monastery. Canonized by the Romanian Orthodox Church in 1992.
[…]
Daniil Sihastrul ignited a hermit movement in northern Moldova, having many novices in the woods surrounding Voroneț, as well as at the hermitages and monasteries in its surroundings. He encouraged Stephen the Great to fight for the defense of Christendom and to build holy places.

He has been considered a saint ever since his life time, being credited with healing the sick, exorcising demons, and removing suffering.

On first glance, it appears that St. Daniil was an eccentric loner who spent his life exorcising his mind from all thought in pursuit of purity of spirit for personal enlightenment, as that was apparently the aim of the Hesychasts. On the other hand, he was not a hermit full time, and used his stone temple as a place of refuge and contemplation. Given that he advised military strategist Stephen The Great, Daniil was well respected at the time (late 1400s AD).

Now what did Stephen The Great do? He stopped the Ottoman Empire warlords from overrunning Moldova, killing Christians and others indiscriminately, and from instituting islam and shari’ia law.

St. Stephen defeated Mehmet at a famous and decisive battle in a place called Vaslui (not far south of Iaṣi in the province of Moldova). Had he not done so, little would have stood between Mehmet and the Ukraine—and the obliteration of the rest of the Orthodox world. Mehmet met his match shortly after having sacked Constantinople. With the rest of the Balkan peninsula falling to Islam’s sword, Mehmet must have seemed unstoppable to Christians everywhere, yet none of the Western powers nor the Western Church would lift a finger against the Ottomans. Thus, Stephen stood more or less alone in defense of Christianity and his homeland [via].

Interesting times, indeed.

Oh, and here’s a photo of Deniis hawking his CDs. I’m not an historian, but it amazes me what one may find just by searching for the origin of an image.

[Images found here and via here.]

Yet God Still Lives Here.

Tuesday, 22 December 2015

Abandoned Church

abandoned-church--winter

Abandoned Church 2

Abandoned Desert Church

Abandoned Church 5

[Found here, here, here, here and here.]


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