Posts Tagged ‘Country Blues’

Saturday Matinee – Robert “Junior” Lockwood, Robert Johnson & Eric Clapton

Saturday, 20 April 2019

That’s Robert “Junior” Lockwood Jr. (1915-2006)

I had no idea of Lockwood’s pedigree when he showed up at an early morning jazz appreciation class I took in college. For him, it was all about the blues, and his lecture/demonstration blew me away.

He was taught guitar by Robert Johnson (1911-1938), the legendary King of the Delta Blues (and the Grandfather of Rock and Roll) hence the nickname Robert “Junior.”

Most of Robert Johnson’s songs have been covered by modern musicians, but I hadn’t heard the original “Hellhound On My Trail” until today. It’s got unusual chord patterns and rhythms:

You sprinkled hot foot powder
All around your daddy’s door.

Here’s Eric Clapton’s version from 2004, and it’s just as disturbing.

Have a great weekend, folks, and remember that everything’s gonna be alright.

Saturday Matinee – Pensen Paletti, Wayne Hancock, Doc Watson & Aerosmith

Saturday, 30 May 2015

THIS is pure awesome. Pensen Paletti [aka Peer Jenson of the Monsters of LeiderMaching] wired up his acoustic guitar and added drum synth keys. Wait for the Theme To Peter Gunn.

Milk Cow Blues” was originally recorded by Sleepy John Estes in 1930. This version is a kinda late night early morning retro country thang performed by Wayne Hancock & Co.  in 2008. Hoy hoy hoy, indeed. Here are two other versions:

Doc Watson was awesome.

Aerosmith did a nice cover of “Milk Cow Blues” that had nothing to do with the 1930 original that I can tell, but at least they worked in some Chuck Berry riffs.

Have a great weekend, folks, and we’ll be back here tomorrow whether you like it or not.

[Note that the Utoobage link for Sleepy John Estes’ “Milk Cow Blues” is not the same song.]

Saturday Matinee – Country Blues Edition, With Furry Lewis, Belton Sutherland, and Taj Mahal Hosts A Documentary

Saturday, 6 October 2012

“If you want to go to heaven when you D.I.E.,
Put on your collar and a T.I.E.
If you wanna scare a rabbit out an L.O.G.,
Just make a little sound like a D.O.G.”

That’s Furry Lewis playing slide on “Kassie Jones,” a song he recorded in 1927. The video is from 1968. A few years later Joni Mitchell met with him and recorded “Furry Sings The Blues” in tribute.

Lewis despised Mitchell’s song and demanded she pay him royalties. “She shouldn’t have used my name in no way, shape, form or faction without consultin’ me ’bout it first. The woman came over here and I treated her right, just like I does everybody that comes over. She wanted to hear ’bout the old days, said it was for her own personal self, and I told it to her like it was, gave her straight oil from the can.”

Belton Sutherland was a Mississipi Delta bluesman. There is no Wiki article for him and little other information about him on the internest. There’s no entry for him in Lawrence Cohn’s “Nothing But The Blues” either. Sutherland was filmed in 1978 by Alan Lomax at Maxwell’s Farm, near Canton Mississippi.

A story about Lomax’ filmAmerican Patchwork” includes one mention:

“…Lomax rounded up folks even he hadn’t heard of, like Mississippi bluesman Belton Sutherland–a master musician who appeared during Lomax’s session with another singer and asked to ‘try’ the guitar.”

That’s a great documentary about Country Blues, hosted by the great Henry Saint Clair Fredericks.

For those of you who find the rough roots of The Blues too tough to listen to, here’s a a WTF moment for a cat instead.

Have a great weekend folks, and we’ll be back tomorrow with more odd funnies.

Saturday Matinee – Red Foley & Grady Martin, Johnny Burnette, The Yardbirds, Aerosmith & Tiny Bradshaw

Saturday, 7 May 2011

Grady Martin was probably the greatest session guitar player in country music (that’s him on an electric double neck). He was the creator of what’s now called Rockabilly, but it was early Rock and Roll. Give him credit also for fuzztone.

That brings us to The Johnny Burnette Trio and “Lonesome Train.” Great early rock. Burnette was the guy who had a hit with a cover of Tiny Bradshaw‘s “Train Kept A-Rollin.” (Grady Martin played for Johnny Burnette in the mid 50s.)

So here’s The Yardbirds‘ 1966 version of “Train Kept A-Rollin”, with Jimmy Page.

Why stop there? Let’s jump to 1977 with Aerosmith’s version of the 1951 R&B song.

What? You haven’t heard Tiny Bradshaw’s original version? Well here you go.

And with that we’re out of here. Have a great weekend, folks, and be back here for more fun tomorrow.

Saturday Matinee – Chip Test, Unethical Football, Burnside & Woods, Rancid, and Buster Keaton

Saturday, 13 November 2010

Memory chip testing WIN!

Awesome play. (Tip o’ the Tarboosh to Kitty.)

Country Blues, with Johhny Woods and R.L. Burnside. Woods teamed up with Mississippi Fred McDowell during the 60s blues revival.

Burnside learned from McDowell who lived in the next county over, but never got much attention until the 90s. Burnside and his family, tired of the life of sharecroppers, moved to Chicago in the early 50s. Subsequently his father, uncle and brother were murdered there.

In 1959 he returned to Mississippi, and was convicted for murder himself, and served time at the Parchman Penitentiary. He was freed after only six months… via a bit of chicanery.

Rancid‘s “Time Bomb” was a retro ska hit in the early 90s.

Buster Keaton, aka The Great Stoneface, was a classic. Grab a beverage and a snack and enjoy a blast from the early years of comedy. Have a great weekend folks, and be back here tomorrow.

Saturday Matinee – Swamp Rock, Ben E. King, Boz & Anson

Saturday, 19 June 2010

I love this. Swamp rock with the most bizarre low budget video I’ve run across (found here) and it’s not even Cajun.

The video for The Reverend Peyton’s Big Damn Band‘s new song Clap Your Hands was shot in one day in a barn in Indiana. All of the dancers, artists, freaks, weirdos, cowboys, kids, donkeys, bunko steerers, chickens, and regular folks, who are all Hoosiers, all volunteered their time and talent because they believed in the song and the band. The video was directed/produced by the acclaimed music video producer Kevin Custer (Lil Wayne, Soldja Boy, Flogging Molly) who remarked the day of the shoot, it would have cost a fortune to get all of these props back in NYC. To which The Rev. Peyton replied, These arent props they are just crap you find in a barn!

Ben E. King‘s great song as performed by a variety of performers. [Tip o’ the Tarboosh to Leeuna for posting it.]

Cbullitt tossed this one into the comments section a few days ago, and now I have new respect for Boz Scaggs. Here he is with Anson Funderburgh and an allstar lineup, including Blue Lou Marini.

Have a big ‘ol honkin’ great weekend folks.


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