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Posts Tagged ‘country’

Saturday Matinee – The Marshall Tucker Band, Sam The Sham & James “Super Chikan” Johnson

Saturday, 8 September 2018

In the late 70s, there was a shift away from hard rock, pop, disco, and other over-produced gag-inducing genres, and I took a liking to Country Rock Jazz fusion. The Marshall Tucker Band caught my ear with “The Last of the Singing Cowboys,” one of the prettiest songs ever written, featuring one of the greatest country rock vocalists ever: Doug Gray (and yeah, that’s one silly-ass hat on the guitar player.)

Domingo “Sam” Samudio is still live and howlin’ in this vid from 2000. IIRC, Sam took his nic “The Sham” because he only knew 3 chords. “Little Red Riding Hood” is probably my favorite STSATP song – even in elementary school we got the innuendo. “Oh, That’s Good” was fun due to our juvenile misinterpretation of the lyrics: “He operated on my 3rd leg…”

Okay, um, let’s move on.

Never heard of James “Super Chikan” Johnson? Crank it up.

Have a great weekend, folks. See you back here tomorrow for more inanity.

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Saturday Matinee – Byron Ferguson, Raúl Malo & The Mavericks, Merle Haggard, The Big Town Playboys with Jeff Beck

Saturday, 11 August 2018

“The center of an aspirin tablet is the exact same size as the center of a beach ball.” – Master Archer Byron Ferguson.
[Found here. Not sure what the target distance is, but it’s still impressive.]

The Mavericks (Raúl Malo / vocals, guitar; Paul Deakin / drums; Jerry Dale McFadden / keyboards, vocals; Eddie Perez / guitar) crank out some big band boogie woogie in Austin, 2004. It’s a cover of Merle Haggard‘s classic 1966 country hit “The Bottle Let Me Down.”

 

Let’s go one more. In 1993, British retrobilly band The Big Town Playboys teamed up with Jeff Beck to record “Crazy Legs,” a collection of Gene Vincent songs. Here’s what happened:

Have a great weekend, folks.
See you back here tomorrow, same Bat Time, same Bat Channel.

[Note: Facebook no longer supports WordPress Publicize connections to Facebook Profiles. Facebook Zucks.]

Saturday Matinee – Dan Hicks & His Hot Licks

Saturday, 30 June 2018

Dan Hicks and His Hot Licks had an unusual sound for a band based in San Francisco at the peak of the psychedelic music era. From an obit in the New York Times 7 February 2016:

“He came to call his music “folk swing,” but that only hinted at the range of influences he synthesized. He drew from the American folk tradition but also from the Gypsy jazz of Django Reinhardt, the Western swing of Bob Wills, the harmony vocals of the Andrews Sisters, the raucous humor of Fats Waller and numerous other sources.”

Hicks was still performing up until his demise at the age of 74.

THAT is the prettiest (and only) cover of Tom Waits‘ classic “The Piano Has Been Drinking” I’ve ever heard. The backup vocals are sultry, and note the subtle hat-tip at about 03:00.

Have a great weekend folks, and a long one if you’re taking advantage of a mid-week Independence Day.

Saturday Matinee – Russian Standoff, Booker T. & The MGs, Merle Travis w/ Speedy West and Judy Hayden, & Paula Jo Taylor

Saturday, 6 January 2018

“We need some untranslatable Russian Stuff.” Young Russian thugs messed with the wrong construction workers [via]. On the other hand, here’s the same crane, so the vid was probably staged for the lulz. They’re apparently in the auto reclamation business.

“Hang ‘Em High” is a musical theme composed by Dominic Frontiere for the soundtrack of the 1968 film of the same name. Though it was first covered by Hugo Montenegro, whose orchestra recorded a full album of music from the film, the tune became a hit in an R&B instrumental version by Booker T. & the M.G.’s that charted #9 Pop and #35 R&B [Quote & links via Wiki].

Merle Travis was a national treasure. Country pop is nothing compared to country swing, and check out that unusual picking style.

Heck, let’s go one more just for fun.

Have a great weekend, folks, and remember that the traffic goes back to default on Monday.

Saturday Matinee – Brazil, The Olympics, Jackie Phelps & Jimmy Riddle, and Tuba Skinny

Saturday, 6 August 2016

I was looking for a live performance of “Brazil” (perhaps by Xavier Cugat) to commemorate the Competitions of the Grecian Gods, but instead we must settle for The Theme Song to Terry Gilliam’s Brazil as performed by Geoffrey Muldaur. He was famous for marrying Maria Grazia Rosa Domenica D’Amato who recorded some popular songs in 1973 about putting camels to bed, and another one about feeling her leg.

There’s no live performance for that one, so I looked for some more Olympics-themed stuff.

The Olympics sound a lot like another Lieber & Stoller product to me, but so what.

Yep. There be the Olympians of Eefin’ and Hambone, Jimmy Riddle & Jackie Phelps.

Let’s go back to Maria Grazia Rosa Domenica D’Amato (aka Maria Muldaur) and the leg feeling stuff. What a sultry voice.

This version by Tuba Skinny is a bit closer to Blue Lu Barker’s 1946 original.

Have a great weekend, folks, and we’ll be back tomorrow with more stuff that’s too hot to handle and too cold to hold.

Saturday Matinee – Big Boy Crudup, Pee Wee King, The Duprees & The Tedeschi Trucks Band

Saturday, 20 February 2016

Arthur “Big Boy” Crudup (1905-1974) recorded “That’s All Right” in 1946, and was dubbed “The Father of Rock and Roll.” Crudup spent his life as a farmer and a moonshiner, and although a talented bluesman from Mississippi, he received few if any royalties for his songs that were covered by many, including Elvis Presley, Elton John and Rod Stewart. Crudup got chumped by the recording industry, and eventually went Galt – he decided that if he couldn’t get a piece of the action, why record at all.

1946 was the same year Pee Wee King recorded the classic “Tennessee Waltz.” (I wasn’t anywhere near being born then. The first version I remember was by Spike Jones and His City Slickers, and I wasn’t born then either, but I got a 45rpm copy, and here’s the flip side.)

Here’s The Duprees‘ version of “You Belong To Me,” and the song is not about slavery.

Nice blues rock jam from husband & wife team known as The Tedeschi Trucks Band.

That’s a wrap for this edition of the Saturday Matinee. Have a great weekend folks.

Saturday Matinee – Shovels & Rope, Richard & Linda Thompson, & Postmodern Jukebox

Saturday, 7 March 2015

Shovels and Rope have a nice country sound – with dawgs. They’re a husband and wife team.

They remind me a little of Richard and Linda Thompson.

That song is one of my all-time favorites for unknown reasons, and we’ve posted at least one other version before.

On the other hand, these folks crack me up because they’re so talented and so spot on. Here’s another great hit from PostModern Jukebox.

 

Have a great weekend, folks. See you back here tomorrow for more pasta and butter.

Saturday Matinee – Holton Rower’s Paint Spills, Jack Broadbent & Floyd Jones

Saturday, 21 February 2015

Interesting artsy spilly painty project [via].

Awesome slide by Jack Broadbent on the streets of Amsterdam in 2014 with a cover of Canned Heat’s “On The Road Again.”

On The Road Again” was penned by the late Alan “Blind Owl” Wilson and Floyd Jones. Wilson died of a barbiturate overdose in 1970 at the age of 27, within a few weeks of the similar drug-related deaths of Jimi Hendrix and Janis Joplin. So what about Floyd Jones? Let’s hear him.

Here’s Floyd Jones‘ “Stockyard Blues” with his own commentary.

Have a great weekend, folks. See you back here tomorrow.

Saturday Matinee – Lee Morse; Doc Watson, David Grisman & Jack Lawrence, & Jimmie Rogers

Saturday, 6 December 2014

Here’s a description of Lee Morse [via]:

“She was 5 feet tall. She was less than 100 lbs “soaking wet”. She spent her childhood in Oregon and Idaho yet was proud of her family’s Southern roots. She could hunt and fish and, if you deserved it, she could punch your lights out! She was Lee Morse, one of the most popular female recording artists during the Jazz Age 20’s and 30’s. And, she is worth remembering.” ~Ian House

Doc Watson, David “Dawg” Grisman and Jack Lawrence live in 1995. Lawrence was the late Watson’s accompianist for many years.

“My Blue Eyed Jane” was written by Lulu Belle White and Jimmie Rogers, first recorded by Jimmy Rogers with Bob Sawyer’s Jazz Band in 1930.

Jimmie Rogers (1897-1933) is considered the Father of Country Music for his long-lasting music influences, worked the railroad until he contracted tuberculosis in 1925. While fighting off the disease and unable to perform physical labor, he returned to his original love, writing and performing, until he succumbed at the age of 35.

Sadly, there was a vaccine to combat TB as early as 1921, but according to Wiki it wasn’t widely available in the U.S. or Europe until after WWII. Rogers also sang about his affliction in “TB Blues.”

Here’s Jimmie Rogers in the Columbia Pictures short “The Singing Brakeman” from 1930.

That’s it for this edition of The Saturday Matinee. Have a great weekend, folks.

 

 

Saturday Matinee – 5 lbs of Possum, Trombone Shorty & Blue Mother Tupelo

Saturday, 28 June 2014

“Five Pounds Of Possum” may be the greatest roadkill song ever.

Trombone Shorty (age 13?) kicks it at 01:20.

Serious Swamp Rock crankage from Blue Mother Tupelo.

Have a great weekend, folks. Be back here tomorrow, and remember that all you have to do is cook out the bacteria.


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