Little Porky Peeper

In the mid-19th Century, not long after the invention of photography, John Benjamin Dancer (1812 – 1887) began printing tiny photographs onto glass slides at his studio in Liverpool, England. In Paris, René Dagron (1817 – 1900) wondered how to circumvent the need for an expensive microscope to view them. In 1859, Dagron patented the first Stanhope lens mounted with a mini-photograph.

He named it after the magnifying device invented 50 years earlier by Charles Stanhope, Third Earl Stanhope (1753-1816). In the late-18th century, Stanhope invented lenses which allowed all sorts of “viewers” to house images in secret. Stanhopes, also called Bijoux Photomicroscopiques, became known as ‘peep holes’, ‘peep-eye views’ or ‘peeps’.

And this little piggy had a secret…

Continue reading “Little Porky Peeper”

Dorkworm of the Deep

Hydrothermal Vent Polychaete Worm Viewed Under An Electron Microscope. Nicholas Gayet 2015

Photograph by Nicolas Gayet of the Paulo Bonifacio lab was a 2015 FEI contest winner.

Polychaetes worms are fascinating. One species are called “Zombie Worms” and includes the Osedax mucofloris, discovered in 2005. Its name translates to “bone-eating snot flower.”

[Image found here.]

Sea Lice

Sea lice are actually jellyfish

The term sea lice was inappropriately coined by residents who suffered strange rashes after swimming in coastal waters in the 1950s, according to the Florida Department of Health. (There is such a thing as actual sea lice, it turns out, but they are tiny parasites that affect fish, not humans.)

The rash that humans tend to get, on the other hand, “is caused by miniature jellyfish larvae trapped under bathing suits when in the water,” states a 2017 brochure available on the Health Department’s website.

“If pressure occurs from exercising, surfboards, lying on the beach, etc., stinging cells are released and cause itching, irritation, and welts,” the brochure continues. The larvae also like to hang out in people’s hair, so the back of the neck—where hair hangs down and touches the skin—is a common place for lesions.

[Image found here, caption here.]

One more thing to keep you awake at night.

This handsome boy is called a Demodex. Its dimensions are approximately 0.3mm, which means you can’t see it living on your face. Especially on your forehead, nose and chin. He’s always there and it will be that way forever. At night, they vigorously mate on your face and then lay its eggs in the pores of your skin. Funniest thing is that the Demodex have no anal orifice to evict. They accumulate and build up to death bursting with… feces. Right on the face. Sweet dreams everyone!

[Image and caption found here.]

Holy Terror

That’s the everted scolex of a Taenia solium, aka, a Pork Tapeworm. How they were able to turn a scolex inside out, or why, is beyond my pay grade.

Teresa Zgoda won 4th Place in the 2017 Nikon Photomicrography Competition with that terrifying micro monster maw. [Found here.]

Two Horse Flies

Horsefly Wet

Horsefly Dry

Both are horseflies, and the top one is a liar. No matter how cute he looks covered in early morning dew, he’s gonna bite you, and the second one is going to laugh.

Yes, it’s true. Horse flies laugh and they know how to throw a trollface.

[Found here, via here.]

Update: Completely forgot The Friday .Gif Post last night. 12 hours of battling red tape at LADBS got me all bonky. Meanwhile, visit our .gif archives here.

Micro Velcro

Lotsa cool electron microscope images with color enhancement found here. Don’t miss the human tongue bacteria to see what’s tasting YOU.

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