Obumbrating Hot Links

Violent Love, The Big Three Trio (1951) Okeh Records Active from 1946-1952, The Big Three Trio consisted of Leonard “Baby Doo” Caston (piano, vocals), Ollie Crawford (guitar, vocals) and Willie Dixon (upright bass, vocals). Dixon wrote this and many other blues standards during his lengthy career. (Note: Crawford replaced band founder and guitarist Bernardo Dennis in 1947.)

Lost sounds.

The can tuner.

Citizens For Sanity.

Root cellars [via Mme. Jujujive].

EV charging stations in California.

Economic forecast [via Bunkerville].

Violent Love, Oingo Boingo, live 1983.

Sea Matheson at Fat Studies Conference.

There’s a hole in the port plate, dear Liza.

August 26, 2002: Meet Marshie was released.

Freespoke is another search engine alternative to Google. (I haven’t checked it out yet – I use DDG.)

[Top image found at Tfarhad.]


From the Archives: 1 year ago. 5 years ago. 10 years ago.

Saturday Matinee – Jared Dines, Hillbilly Moon Explosion, The Baboons, Howlin’ Wolf with Willie Dixon

Jared Dines commissioned the design of a 17-string guitar, paid $1,200 for it, then learned that it was made in China for $400. Pissed him off, so he destroyed it. He then ordered this 18-string from a legit Australian company. Nice catchy tune…

Hillbilly Moon Explosion is interesting. Not too many bands feature Wednesday Addams teaching Lurch how to do The James Brown (at least I think that’s the dance).

The Baboons‘ “It’s Dark” has a solid (but unattributed) Howlin’ Wolf groove, so let’s go there.

That’s Willie Dixon on bass. He wrote, arranged, produced, played and sang on some of the most influential blues standards in modern history, so it’s really a Dixon Groove.

Have a great weekend, folks. See you back here when you’re ready.

Saturday Matinee – All Your Bass Are Belong To Us

Postmodern Jukebox‘s “All About That Bass” has just the right amount of slink with a cool bass stunt.

There’s some serious funkslappin going on in Marcus Miller‘s 2008 jam version of Tower of Power‘s 1973 hit “What Is Hip.”

This 6-string bass street jammer’s pretty good, too.

We’ve posted Willie Dixon‘s classic “Bassology” before, and it’s a good wrap up for this edition of The Saturday Matinee. Have a great weekend, folks.

Saturday Matinee – Sister Rosetta Tharpe, Willie Dixon and a Big Wad of Blues

Sister Rosetta Tharpe‘s  version of “Didn’t It Rain” (Manchester, England in 1964). She exemplified the musical connection between gospel, blues and rock and roll. The song first appeared as piano sheet music in 1927, but I’d guess it dates to the 1800s [h/t Bunkessa].

What a treasure trove this is [via]. In the early 1960s The Blues was largely ignored in the U.S., yet many classic artists found a receptive audience  in Britain. From the Utoobage description:

“Recorded live for TV broadcast throughout Britain, these historic performances have been unseen for nearly 40 years. Filmed with superb camera work and pristine sound, 14 complete performances and 4 bonus performances are included by Sonny Boy Williamson, Muddy Waters, Lonnie Johnson, Big Joe Williams, Lightnin’ Hopkins, Sugar Pie DeSanto, Howlin’ Wolf, Big Joe Turner, Junior Wells, and Sister Rosetta Tharpe.”

Spotted Willie Dixon on bass in that vid, so let’s post this:

Yeah, he stuttered in real life, yet Dixon wrote and performed an incredible amount of classic blues tunes.

This compilation should hold you for a while. Have a great weekend, folks, and may you never be nervous.

Saturday Matinee – Zappa & Zappa & Tesh, The Sensational Alex Harvey Band, Sonny Boy Williamson & Co.

Ahmet & Dweezil Zappa with John Tesh and a lady in a box on Conan O’Brien‘s show. [Found here].

The Sensational Alex Harvey Band circa 1973. The SAHB was popular in the UK, but didn’t catch on in the US (with the exception of the Cleveland Ohio region).

On 4 February 1982, a day short of his 47th birthday, Harvey suffered a massive heart attack while waiting to take a ferry from Zeebrugge, Belgium back to England after performing a Belgian gig with his new band, the Electric Cowboys. He suffered a second fatal attack in an ambulance on the way to hospital [Wiki].

Getting Out Of Town – Awesome lineup from 1963:
Sonny Boy Williamson Vocal, Harmonica
Sunnyland Slim: Piano
Hubert Sumlin: Guitar
Willie Dixon: Bass
Clifton James: Drums

That should do it for today’s edition of The Saturday Matinee. Have a great weekend, folks.

Saturday Matinee – Sugar Pie DeSanto, Hubert Sumlin, Sunnyland Slim, Willie Dixon & Clifton James

Here’s Sugar Pie DeSanto‘s version of Jimmy Reed‘s 1955 hit “Baby What You Want Me To Do,” backed by  Hubert Sumlin/Guitar, Sunnyland Slim/Piano, Willie Dixon/Bass & Clifton James/Drums (1964).

Here’s some more: Hubert Sumlin, Sunnyland Slim and Willie Dixon, with “Come On Home Baby.” (1964)

The Chicago Blues Allstars (undated) featuring Willie Dixon/Bass, Lafeyete Leake/Piano, Lee Jackson/Guitar, Clifton James/Drums.

Got it? Good. Have a great weekend, folks.

Saturday Matinee – Willie Dixon, Stones, Gatemouth Brown

Willie Dixon’s “Nervous.” (Dixon was one of the most prolific bluesmen of his time, and was a stutterer in real life, rarely sang because of it.)

“19th Nervous Breakdown” is a cool limp synch by the Anti-Beatles.

Gatemouth Brown was awesome, played Texas blues/swing with finesse and class.

Short post for Saturday as I’m out of town. See you back here tomorrow with more BoogedyBoogedy.

Saturday Matinee: Ska x 4 + Willie Dixon

Awesome original by Prince Buster, later covered by Annette Funicello with Fishbone (!) and worth reposting:

SkaBoom‘s “Love and Affection.”

Filmed at 86 street, a former night club located on the Vancouver Expo Grounds, and at the UBC War Memorial Auditorium.

And then there was Oingo Boingo‘s cover of one of Willie Dixon‘s classics, “Violent Love.” Unfortunately, Dixon’s original isn’t available on the Utoobage, so we’ll default to this classic:

“Crazy ’bout My Baby” from 1966, Dixon on bass and vocals, and with that, we’re out. Have a great weekend, folks, and we’ll see ya’ll back here tomorrow.

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