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Posts Tagged ‘dangerous’

Saturday Matinee – Turbulence, Laurie Anderson, MiniMall & The We Five

Saturday, 15 July 2017

This Is Your Captain speaking. We’re experiencing some minor turbulence and we ask that you stop screaming.” Wild rides were ridden on at the Birmingham Airport 23 February 2017 [via].

Okay, there’s a link to some surreal 1980s Laurie Anderson stuff above, so let’s go to 2010 live for fun.

Anderson was the Ken Nordine of the 80s (without the baritone voice).

MiniMall has a bit of a retro vibe and consists of:
Merced Stratton — composer, ukulele, vocals
Maral Ohan — composer, vocals
Allegra Rosenberg — composer, bass
Wynne Males — trumpet, vocals
Brennan Doyle — drums

[Merced & Wynne ate sandwiches on our rock-n-roll patio recently because Bunkessa knows them. They were all like harmonizing and musical and stuff.]

The “We Five” had this awesome hit in 1965, a cover of Ian & Sylvia‘s song “You Were On My Mind.”

Sylvia Fricker supposedly wrote it in a bathtub in Greenwich Village in 1962. Yeah it’s lip-synched, but it’s still fun as hell. One of these days I need to find out who the lead guitar on the left is because he rocks.

Have a great weekend, folks. Be back here tomorrow for more of you-know-what.

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Fearless or Insane? You be the judge.

Thursday, 6 July 2017

Click on each and any image and be amazed.

[Found here. This related .gif got a lot of attention recently, too.]

Cliffside Path, China

Tuesday, 30 May 2017

As wonderful as Chinese tea is, it is definitely not something you’d closely associate with exhilaration, adrenaline and the fear of death. Mt. Huashan in China, however, manages to bring all of these things together by featuring a death-defying cliff-side mountain climb that brings daring visitors to a tea house 2,160 m (7,087 ft) up on the mountain’s southern peak.

Mt. Huashan has been a place of religious importance since at least the 2nd century BCE, when a Daoist temple was established at its base. Since then, pilgrims, monks and nuns have inhabited the mountain and the surrounding area. A network of dangerous and precipitous trails allows them to access the mountain’s five summits, each of which has a religious structure like the tea house on the southern summit. Together, these five summits form the points of a flower shape.

I don’t do heights very well – I get a visceral reaction when I’m too close to the edge – and this insane video spooked me just by watching it.

[Image found here. More info & pics here.]

The .Gif Friday Post No. 445 – Demolition Demon, Roll Survivor & Rock This Way

Friday, 29 July 2016

Demolition Man

Rolled It

Trek Rock FAIL

[Found here, here and here.]

“Where Do We Go From Here?” Real Life Jenga.

Wednesday, 5 February 2014

Jenga Stairs

“Damn. Gotta pound out another exit, Danny. Guess I’ll see ‘ya on the other side, mate. Look after me missus.”

[Found here; related post here.]

The Day Gravity Changed

Tuesday, 24 September 2013

TILT 2

Except for rotating and cropping the image and enhancing the colors, that’s not a photo shop. The original image [below the break] is even more bizarre. (more…)

It’s All Mine

Thursday, 18 April 2013

HG0892-001

[Found here.]

Interlocking Pavers

Wednesday, 13 March 2013

Interlocking Pavers

Yeah, that looks cool, shows how interlocking pavers work.

It’s cool until you realize that someone has to pay several hundred clams to repair the damage. Until then, if some little kids are on the wrong side of the stack when the wind blows…

Please don’t do this.

[Found here.]

Saturday Matinee – Stag Party, Bottle Ninja & The Neville Bros.

Saturday, 20 October 2012

Don’t disturb deer, and don’t mess with a stag during rutting season. [via]

“He really, really, really hates plastic bottles.” [via]

The Neville Brothers with “Brother John / Iko Iko” 1995, Stuttgart.

According to Wikipedia:
The song “Iko Iko” was written in 1953 in New Orleans by James “Sugar Boy” Crawford about two competing Mardi Gras Tribes/Krewes. “Jock-a-mo” was the original version of the song “Iko Iko” recorded by The Dixie Cups in 1965. Their version came about by accident. They were in a New York City studio for a recording session when they began an impromptu version of “Iko Iko,” accompanied only by drumsticks on studio ashtrays.
[Listen to it on the Utoobage here. Lyrics are in the notes.]

Other trivia: Crawford formed a band which local DJ Doctor Daddy-O named “The Chapaka Shawee” – Creole for “We Aren’t Raccoons.”

Fun Facts to Know and Tell. Have a great weekend, folks.

Handscrews

Wednesday, 18 July 2012

Neodymium magnets. No mess with.

[Found here.]


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