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Posts Tagged ‘dixieland’

Saturday Matinee – Trapeze Strip Tease, Al Cohn, Shaye Cohn & Tuba Skinny

Saturday, 21 September 2019

From the Utoobage description:

Laverie Vallee, known better as Charmion, was a Sacramento born trapeze artist who possessed strength and a physique most men would be envious of. However, she was most well known for her risqué striptease performances. The act was incredibly impressive and provocative for the era. One of her greatest fans was Thomas Edison. As a result of that adoration, on November 11, 1901 Charmion committed a simplified version of her act to film for Edison. Charmion eventually retired to Santa Ana, California. She passed away on February 6, 1949 at the age of 73.

[Video found here. It’s silent. Talkies didn’t become commercially viable until the 1920s, so don’t crank up the volume and blow your speakers later.]


The Al Cohn Quartet at the Sanremo Jazz Festival 1987.
Al Cohn (1925-1988) was one of the greatest improvisational jazz saxophonists of all time. Now check this out:

That’s Shaye Cohn, Al Cohn’s granddaughter, playing stride.
Now check THIS out:

Tuba Skinny on Royal Street, New Orleans, April 2013 (covering Bessie Smith‘s “You’ve Got To Give Me Some” 1929).

Current lineup:

Shaye Cohn – Cornet, Piano, Fiddle, Accordion, Banjo & Spoons
Craig Flory – Clarinet & Saxophone
Barnabus Jones – Trombone, Banjo, Fiddle, Guitar, Vocals
Todd Burdick – Tuba
Gregory Sherman – Vocals, Guitar & HarmonicaMax Bien-Kahn – Guitar & Banjo
Jason Lawrence – Banjo & Guitar
Robin Rapuzzi – Washboard & Drum set
Erika Lewis – Vocals & Bass drum

Dang. I’ve been impressed with Shaye Cohn’s stuff for years without knowing her pedigree, and now I know where she got it from. Note how she cues the band while playing.

Have a great weekend, folks, and we’ll do something else tomorrow.

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Saturday Matinee – Leon Redbone (1892-2019)

Saturday, 1 June 2019

“Why don’t they play pretty music any more?”

Leon Redbone was an iconic performer who reinvigorated the music of the late 19th to early 20th century, including blues, ragtime, dixieland jazz and country. That he pulled it off in the mid 1970s is an interesting commentary of the state of music of the time (mainstream rock was sucking donkeys). You couldn’t get more retro than Leon Redbone at that time, and he stepped right into the mix.

Rolling Stone described his repertoire as “so authentic you can hear the surface noise of an old 78 rpm.” During a 1974 interview (prior to release of any album) they asked where he first played in public. Redbone responded, “In a pool hall, but I wasn’t playing guitar, you see. I was playing pool.” Apparently he was pretty good at it.

I learned of the song “Ain’t Misbehavin” via some sheet music my late grampa had, and I liked the tune. I’d never heard of Fats Waller before I heard Leon Redbone’s version.

Then I heard Redbone’s over-the-top absurd version of The Sheik of Araby, a cover of this (1937) which was a cover of this (1922). I became a fan.

In the early ’80s I saw Mr. Redbone perform at The Golden Bear (a small but famous venue with no bad seats). His props were a rattan chair, a side table with a lamp, and his guitar. He was in the middle of a song when he saw the flash of a Kodak Instamatic camera. With lightning speed, he stopped, grabbed a Polaroid Swinger and took a photo of the photographer, then sat quietly humming until the image appeared. He held it up to view.

“Ahhh. Not a bad likeness.”

Then he resumed the song exactly where he left off.

I wasn’t aware of this until today, but there is a documentary on Leon Redbone. Here’s the trailer:

“He was always mysterious, he was always coming and going. It was almost like he was there one second and he’d be gone the next… and you never knew where he’d gone or why or how he’d even left, but suddenly he wasn’t there anymore.” – Jane Harbury, Publicist.

Here’s a link to the full documentary if you’re interested. It’s only 16 minutes, but it’s worth it.

Leon Redbone, you were a breath of fresh air into the stagnant late 70s music scene. May You Rest In Peace.

[Related posts here.]

Saturday Matinee – Chet Atkins, Louis Armstrong, Joe MacDonald & The New Orleans Jazz Hounds

Saturday, 18 June 2016

Chet Atkins‘ version of the jazz classic “Muskrat Ramble.” This is perfect early morning sunrise roadtrip music. From Wiki:

“Muskrat Ramble” is a jazz composition written by Kid Ory in 1926. It was first recorded on February 26, 1926, by Louis Armstrong and his Hot Five, and became the group’s most frequently recorded piece.

There’s some dispute over the authorship of the song, as Lil Hardin (pianist, composer, arranger, singer, bandleader, and the 2nd Mrs. Armstrong) may have come up with it and missed out on the credit. According to Sidney Bechet, Hardin merely renamed a song stolen by Kid Ory from Buddy Bolden (“The Old Cow Died and the Old Man Cried”). Eh… I’m not a jazz historian so we’ll leave it at that.

Satchmo in Munich 1962. I love this stuff.

Just a few years later, Joe McDonald stole the same music, renamed it, put words to it and performed it at Woodstock as an anti-Vietnam War protest song. (I didn’t realize until I scanned his bio – McDonald’s parents were communists and he was named after Joseph Stalin. Now it all makes sense.)

Yeah, we all know about the bloodshed that happened after South Vietnam got chumped, Joe, and I bet you never paid any royalties to Ory, Hardin or Armstrong either.

Okay, let’s lighten it up a tad.

Live from Tokyo, it’s The New Orleans Jazz Hounds. Recorded 14 May 2016, it features Kikuchi Haruka, Tamura Makiko, Sato Shingo. I don’t know who plays what, but it’s still a nice tribute.

Have a great weekend, folks. Let’s see what happens tomorrow.

The Saturday Matinee – Capuchin Monkeys, The Cramps, The Two Man Gentlemen Band & Tuba Skinny

Saturday, 12 December 2015

This clip from Frans de Waal’s TED presentation amuses me (and I may have posted it previously).

The Cramps were a product of the legendary 1970s CBGB NY punk scene, as were these folks:

Okay I lied. The Two Man Gentlemen Band never played at CBGBs (which stood for Country, Blue Grass & Blues in case you didn’t know). Let’s go for one more.

Tuba Skinny is a modern day traditional classic.

Have a great weekend, folks, and we’ll be back tomorrow, rain or shine.

Saturday Matinee – Stephanie Trick, Tuba Skinny, Nanook & Zappa

Saturday, 31 January 2015

“Hand Full of Keys,” performed here by Stephanie Trick, is a Fats Waller composition, circa 1938. Awesome stride piano style. Although I’m somewhat ambidextrous and have a basic understanding of music theory and chords, there’s no way I could cut those chops.

Tuba Skinny is my favorite band these days.

I had a conversation with some of my co-workers recently, and the topic of Yellow Snow came up. I tried to explain Nanook of the North and failed, so we’re forced into Zappa mode.

You can find Zappa’s “Nanook Rubs It” on the Utoobage on your own, but “Deathless Horsie” is amazing.

Have a great SuperBowl Weekend folks. Seattle sucks big green donkeys because Seattle sucks big green donkeys. Everyone outside of Seattle knows Seattle sucks big green donkeys and so does Seattle. Seattle sucks big green donkeys.

Saturday Matinee – The Sant Andreu Jazz Band, Tuba Skinny & Trombone Shorty

Saturday, 3 January 2015

The Sant Andreu Jazz Band is from Barcelona Spain, features 7-20 year olds. Here’s their website. I love early American jazz, and they nail it.

Some friends visited New Orleans recently, gave me a CD of Tuba Skinny. They didn’t believe that I’d heard of them even though I’d posted two of their vids some time ago. The girl on cornet is awesome, knows her chops.

Want some funk with that jazz? Here’s Trombone Shorty.

Have a great extended holiday weekend, folks. See y’all back here tomorrow.

 

Saturday Matinee – Farmer Derek Klingenberg, The Fire House Five+Two & Trombone Shorty

Saturday, 23 August 2014

Calling cows with a bovine ‘bone by Farmer Derek Klingenberg.

The Fire House Five (plus Two)  play “Red Hot River Valley” (1951). The band was made up of members of Disney’s animation department and were fairly successful.

Trombone Shorty on trumpet with “Hurricane Season” (2010)  This New Orleans funk jazz mix works.

That should hold you for a while. More stuff coming down the pipe, so see you tomorrow.

Saturday Matinee – 5 lbs of Possum, Trombone Shorty & Blue Mother Tupelo

Saturday, 28 June 2014

“Five Pounds Of Possum” may be the greatest roadkill song ever.

Trombone Shorty (age 13?) kicks it at 01:20.

Serious Swamp Rock crankage from Blue Mother Tupelo.

Have a great weekend, folks. Be back here tomorrow, and remember that all you have to do is cook out the bacteria.

Saturday Matinee – Tuba Skinny with Erika Lewis, Leon Redbone, Brent Johnson & The Call Up

Saturday, 17 May 2014

Tuba Skinny on a hot, steamy New Orleans day, playing James Scott’s “Climax Rag”  from 1914. Pay attention to the girl on cornet – she knows exactly how to do it right – and before you assume that the girl on bass drum is only there for eye candy, check this out:

That’s Erika Lewis & Tuba Skinny performing at The Louisiana Busker Fest in Abita Springs 21 April 2013.  BTW, the band is from Tasmania. Now, how ’bout some Leon?

Leon Redbone made his debut in 1976 with his album “On The Tracks.” Here he is on SNL, and here’s Mr. Redbone’s  home page.

Mike Imbasciani with Brent Johnson & the Call Up doing a heavy swamp rock take of Chick Willis‘ “Stoop Down Baby.”

There are enough links up there to keep you out of trouble for a few hours. Have a great weekend folks, see you back here tomorrow for more fun stuff.

[Update: Tuba Skinny is from Louisiana. Thanks to Lulu for the correction.]

Saturday Matinee – Fireflies, Pete Daily & Red Nichols

Saturday, 5 April 2014

Timelapse of fireflies by Vincent Brady [via].

Pete Daily‘s “Over The Waves” from 1951: Daily on cornet, Burt Johnson trombone, Pud Brown clarinet, Skippy Anderson piano, Len Esterdahl banjo, Bud Hatch tuba and Hugh Allison drums.

Red Nichols & His Five Pennies rocked your grandparents, assuming your grandparents were entirely cool and bitchin’. (Of course they were.)

Have a great weekend, folks. Be back here tomorrow for more inanity.


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