Saturday Matinee – Bobby Ramone, America Paz, Greensky Bluegrass & GA-20

GANJA GANJA HEY!

1. I Don’t Wanna Stand Up
2. Stirring In My Room
3. Today One Love, Tomorrow The World
4. Jamming Affairs
5. Three Little Surfin’ Birds
6. Kaya Bop
7. Glad To See You Cry
8. Is This Love Kills
9. Bye Bye Redemption


America Paz: “I spent three years playing on the street in Chile – when the video went viral my career changed.” More about her here.

Greensky BluegrassLiving Over reminds me of some of the stuff I’d listen to on early morning cross-country roadtrips many years ago.

GA-20 does a mighty fine cover of Billy The Kid Emerson‘s No Teasin’ Around (1954). I need to pay more attention to these guys from Boston.

That’ll do for this edition of The Saturday Matinee. Rock on me bloogies, have a great weekend, and we’ll think of something else to do tomorrow.

Saturday Matinee Halloween Edition – The Ramones, Sally Cruikshank & Oingo Boingo

First recorded in 1976, The RamonesI Don’t Wanna Go Down To The Basement is sort of appropriate.

Sally Cruikshank‘s animations are Betty Boop on acid.
Face like a Frog (1987) includes the Cab Calloway-esque song Don’t Go In The Basement (starts at 02:26 ). In 2017, Cruikshank herself added this to the YouTube comments:

Danny Elfman composed the track for this film. Period. Copyright mine. Then a year or two later I gave his agents permission to include it on a compilation LP, I guess put out by [David] Geffen. Now they claim I got the music from the album or something. They’re wrong. My film came first. My husband’s going to get into it with Geffen.”

“I don’t always listen to Dead Man’s Party, but when I do so do the neighbors.” – YouTube comment

Oingo Boingo was a standout band of the 1980s, combining ska, punk, jazz & rock, and Dead Man’s Party became a Halloween party standard. According to Wikipedia:

The lyric, “I hear the chauffeur coming to my door / Says there’s room for maybe just one more,” is a reference to “The Bus-Conductor,” a short story by E. F. Benson about a hearse driver, first published in The Pall Mall Magazine in 1906.

Video is from the 1986 movie Back To School. Yeah, 34 years ago…

Happy Halloween, folks!
This year I’m gonna scare half the neighborhood by NOT wearing a mask. Hope you get all the tricks you deserve and all the treats that you don’t.

[Paranoia moons previously posted here. More Halloween-related posts in the archives.]

Leftover Turkey with Hot Links

Janet Nguyen’s story is amazing.

How to unload a truck with no dock.

#Antifa thug earns a nap on the asphalt.

Conan O’Brian interviews Joey Ramone 1999.

A Foley Artist is a sound effects technician who emulates the work of Jack Foley.

Terrence Aloysius Gorcey was one of my favorite 1940s Hollywood stars when I was a kid.

Gene Cernan.was 11th and last astronaut to set foot on the moon. The documentary “The Last Man On The Moon” could have included more technical information and less of his private life, but it’s still interesting.

From the “Who The Hell Is That?” Department:
Name the rock icon pictured above. Answer is below the break. Take a guess before you click, leave your initial suss in the comments.

Continue reading “Leftover Turkey with Hot Links”

Saturday Matinee – James Burke, The Offspring & Full Blown Cherry (and a Yorkshire Pudding Recipe)

I’ve posted this one before. It’s a clip from the BBC television series “Connections” (a segment from the 1978 episode entitled “The Trigger Effect“). The message is a good one, and since the missus and I are still binge-watching The Walking Dead, it seems appropriate.

Marc Bell, aka Marky Ramone (long time drummer for The Ramones) sits in with The Offspring. in 2013. This also seems appropriate due to the current rains in CA.

I don’t post many music videos that don’t have video, but I’ll make an exception for this one because it seems appropriate.

From the Utoobage description you can find your favorites:

01 Blitzkrieg Bop 00:00
02 Rockaway Beach 01:52
03 Sheena Is A Punk Rocker 02:58
04 Cretin Hop 06:55
05 She’s The One 08:44
06 Judy Is A Punk 10:54
07 The KKK Took My Baby Away 12:59
08 Teenage Lobotomy 16:06
09 I Wanna Be Sedated 18:11
10 Do You Remember Rock ‘N’ Roll Radio 20:21
11 Beat On The Brat 22:56
12 Bop ‘Til You Drop 26:08

Judy Is A Punk” in Johnny Cash style is hilarious, and Elvis singing “Beat on the Brat” is awesome. That’s enough to keep your ears full while you’re searching for Yorkshire pudding recipes that don’t turn out like pizza crusts.

The following is not a video either, but it also seems appropriate.

simpsons-roast-sirloin-of-beef-with-yorkshire-pudding

Have a great appropriate weekend, folks.

Saturday Matinee – Tributes to Ben E. King, Johnny Cash & The B-52’s

Tribute to a great singer Ben E. King, who passed away 30 April 2015, as performed by an a cappella group featuring Grandpa Eliott Small.

Prior to his solo career, Ben E. King was a key member of The Drifters, a doo-wop group founded in 1953 and fronted by Clyde McPhatter. King replaced McPhatter as lead singer in 1958, and the New Drifters were born. Most of King’s hits were written by the team of Jerry Lieber and Mike Stoller, prolific songwriters of the time.

Tribute to Johnny Cash (1932-2003) on beer bottles [via].

Tribute to the B-52s by Full Blown Cherry. Yeah, it’s a crappy video, but watch what they pull off. They’re not amateurs, and by 02:50 a roadie has to hold the amp down. Any three-man band that can pull off a Rockabilly Tribute To The Ramones gets my full respect.

Have a great weekend folks, be back here in a few minutes.

R.I.P. Erdélyi Tamás, aka Tommy Ramone

 

Another punk bit the big one.

Erdélyi Tamás, aka Tom Erdelyi, aka Tommy Ramone, assembled and helped create one of the most influential bands ever. The Ramones never had a hit single, despite hiring the legendary (and mentally disturbed) Phil Spector.

Tommy Ramone was not new to the recording industry when he and other Brooklyn friends decided to form a band to provide an alternative to the pre-packaged marketing-department formulaic garbage that infested the airwaves in the mid to late 1970s. The Ramones went back to rock and roll garage-band basics, with a twist – they played louder and faster.

That The Ramones rose to popularity by playing 3-chord rock in an obscure venue in the New York City Bowery district says a lot. Punk was born at CBGB’s, and although The Ramones’ garage-band style never garnered them a hit, their influence was huge.

Their message was, “Screw Emerson Lake and Palmer, Yes, Kansas, Foreigner and ELO! Screw CSN&Y and Boston! Listen to C, F & G!”

And The Ramones were spot on. R.I.P. Erdélyi Tamás, and thanks.